For questions regarding the organization and identification of transducted sensory information in the brain and its interpretation and consolidation in the mind

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1answer
840 views

How does the brain read rotated text?

Suppose a human ran across a letter written at a 45 degree angle. How does the brain read this text? Most people don't often see text written at an angle, so it seems safe to assume that the brain ...
4
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1answer
103 views

Can the brain work better in stressful conditions?

I was watching a documentary about the brain the other day, BBC's Human Body - Brain Power. It said that the perception power of the brain increases when you are in a tense situation. For example; if ...
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2answers
145 views

Which physical properties of a stimulus can a human attend to?

I am not only curious about speech, but for concreteness in illustrating my question, I consider the case of speech perception. Assume a listener is presented with an acoustic waveform. The wave ...
4
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1answer
28 views

What study showed that humans can successfully detect objects within images once they are able to recognize those objects?

A professor in an online lecture I was watching referenced a study which he said showed that our ability as humans to detect objects within scenes (especially complex scenes) was very much connected ...
4
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1answer
104 views

Psychology behind repeated viewing of certain pictures and songs

Often it happens that we like to frequently listen to a particular tune or song or view some pictures or images repeatedly time after time. What are the reasons and psychology behind this?
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1answer
187 views

Can people alleviate a negative halo effect about them?

According to Wikipedia: "The halo effect or halo error is a cognitive bias in which one's judgments of a person’s character can be influenced by one's overall impression of him or her." ...
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1answer
55 views

What is an acquired taste?

Some foods are delicious. People love eating them, and the experience has a positive reinforcement. Thus, people will eat the food again. Some foods are instead "challenging", at least initially. For ...
4
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1answer
42 views

Study of recollection of drawings based on labels

I remember stumbling across a very interesting study/experiment a few months ago. Now I want to try to find it again. Unfortunately I cannot for the life of me recall the name of the experiment nor ...
4
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1answer
70 views

How do people respond to auditory warning signals?

I am working on a literature review of total reaction time to an auditory alert, in a transport context. All of the literature I can find about perception-response times are in the context of visual ...
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1answer
68 views

Why different responses to target and distractor in three-stimulus oddball procedure?

In the three-stimulus oddball procedure, there is an infrequent target in a background of frequently occurring standard stimuli and infrequently occurring distracter stimuli. My question is, since the ...
4
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1answer
118 views

How effective are high audio frequencies in commercials in getting audience attention?

Does anyone know of a peer reviewed article that describes how commercials will often contain high audio frequencies in order to attract the viewer's attention? Referrals to commercials using any ...
4
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1answer
122 views

Has there been any serious research on subliminal messaging?

I certainly don't question the existence of subliminal perception which has been demonstrated many times in priming studies like those of Daniel Schacter and many others, nor do I reject the notion of ...
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1answer
63 views

When does anchoring improve our judgement?

Anchoring is the behavioral pattern where the first piece of information we receive about a situation is what all other data points are compared to. For example, the price of the first menu item we ...
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1answer
50 views

What human limitations are there to object tracking and recognition?

I'm thinking about trying to implement object recognition/tracking using a silicon retina (also known as the Dynamic Vision Sensor) and using the Semantic Pointer Architecture as my cognitive model. ...
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0answers
33 views

Is there an experiment where participant tries to move object with brain-machine interface and object is moved by someone else?

Psychological experiment where subjects are first taught to move a object just by thinking about moving it (subject's brains are being read with a machine that moves the object). Then the object is ...
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0answers
30 views

Grating orientation & frequency which induces highest gamma

I am doing some research on perception and gamma activity in V1 area. To check some of my results I need to find an experimental result, from which I would know which orientations and frequencies of ...
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0answers
56 views

How does human brain pick out the most likely representation of object when an object is ambiguous?

For example, it is dim light and an object is in partial shade, hiding some features of an object. It is a rounded, dark brownish object. The object is rather ambiguous - it could be a rock, a potato, ...
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0answers
42 views

What is the name of the effect or concept behind getting along better with people after time apart?

I notice this happens ubiquitously. When siblings are apart in college, or kids away from parents due to college, or even long distance relationships - during a reunion (like over the holidays) only ...
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0answers
35 views

Do single-feature objects tend to attract attention more rapidly than conjunction objects, or vice-versa?

For example, would a two-colour object attract attention more quickly than a one-colour object, or vice-versa?
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0answers
70 views

What are the clues on how 'vivid' someone's sensory imagination is?

For example, I can imagine me eating barbecue with some details, like appearance, smell, temperature, taste etc, and I end up experiencing all these qualities to a certain extent. But I guess each ...
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0answers
36 views

Current directions in emulation theory

Over the decades there have been several theories from various aspects of cognitive science that have appealed to a link between perception and action as a way of understanding information processing ...
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0answers
46 views

What neurological processes occur with 'revulsion'?

As the title asks, what neurological processes occur when we feel revulsion? By revulsion, I mean the involuntary and voluntary physical and psychological responses far stronger than the aversion ...
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0answers
57 views

Are people less bothered by problems they create for themselves?

I notice that I am more annoyed by problems when I am not the one that created them. Two examples would be Cleaning up someone else's mess is much more annoying than cleaning up my own When ...
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0answers
40 views

Does the subjective experience of artificial light brightness vary for people, if so, by how much?

I'm thinking about human perception and particularly the experience of how bright artificial light is. I'm talking about dusk, when the sun has set and only street lamps and light reflecting off ...
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0answers
52 views

How do humans perceive height or vertical drop?

I'm looking at this video: Neil Burgess: How your brain tells you where you are, which discusses neurons within the brain that help people remember where stuff is in relation to other objects. I'm ...
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0answers
95 views

The effect of lifestyle photography on sales conversion rates

I work for a large UK-based clothing retailer. After some initial customer testing with our product details page (on our website) there has been some debate on the following question: Do customers ...
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0answers
253 views

Binaural Beats meets Sound-Color-Synesthesia

Binaural beats, the perception of which arises in the brain for specific physical stimuli. ... The effect on the brainwaves depends on the difference in frequencies of each tone: for example, if ...
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3answers
111 views

Failing to recognise one's own work

Disclaimer: This is not a self help question, I am using myself as an example to illustrate my question. Example: I have posted many questions and answers on this site within a relatively short ...
3
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1answer
677 views

When counting a given letter in sentences, why do people tend to omit occurrences in certain common words?

I have noticed that when I, and presumably others, count the number of times the letter F appears in the following passage: ...
3
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1answer
61 views

Name of a cognitive test assessing whether a child can think independently

I am looking for a names / examples of a tests that determine if the child is thinking on its own (I have tried searching on wikipedia topics about cognitive sciences/ psychology etc. with no luck). ...
3
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2answers
105 views

How to analyse 3 by 3 design with Likert scale ratings?

I want to understand what would be the best way to analyze the results of an online likert-scale ratings of pictures on 3 dimensions. I have 3 groups of participants from different countries. They are ...
3
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2answers
82 views

Binary classification as a cognitive strategy?

Is there any research investigating whether the human cognitive system has a tendency to reduce complex systems or spectra of data in terms of binary contrast? There are many common-sense dual ...
3
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3answers
142 views

What is a scientifically plausible method by which people might in the future be able to read minds? [closed]

I am writing a book. It will be post-apocalyptic, and the apocalypse I'm thinking of will involve people being able to read each other's mind. Can any of you give me a slightly plausible reason that ...
3
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2answers
345 views

What is the maximum size of content the human eye can focus upon?

What is the maximum size of content the human eye can focus upon on a computer screen? Is there a general equation that gives this size as a measure of distance from the screen etc.? What is the ...
3
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2answers
174 views

Can ESP and out-of-body phenomena be understood as a form of dreaming or hallucination?

Currently reading about psychedelic experiences, and it is noted in Wikipedia that: Level 4 psychedelic experience Strong hallucinations, i.e. objects morphing into other objects. ...
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1answer
61 views

Can time be perceived differently depending on a user's feeling?

You often hear that time passes more quickly when you're having fun. And the opposite is also "true" in common belief, that when you're bored time is very slow. But we know that time is almost linear ...
3
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2answers
96 views

Does the time required to read a word grow linearly with the number of characters?

I recently installed a speed reader on my tablet. Now I wonder how the minimal time needed to read an $N$-letter word grows. There was this previous question on the relationship between sentence ...
3
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1answer
518 views

Why do “cool” colors, which are actually warmer, look cool, and vice versa?

Why do cool colors look cool that are in fact warmer, and why do warm colors look warm when they are actually cooler? Blue wavelength has higher energy than red, i.e, blue flame is hotter than red ...
3
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1answer
82 views

How can pain sensations appear to originate within the person's skull?

I've read that humans have some sort of a kinesthetic model of their body and muscles. This internal representation of the body is used to control and coordinate locomotion. I don't remember if ...
3
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1answer
52 views

Is it conceivable to transmit all sound information in the tactile modality?

You may have heard of Evelyn Glennie, an acclaimed solo virtuoso percussionist. She has been profoundly deaf from the age of 12, but learned to differentiate pitch tactilely. She had absolute pitch, ...
3
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1answer
1k views

Why do humans' eyes enter an unfocused gaze when recalling a memory or imagining something?

The question is self-explanatory (I hope). Is this trait unique to humans? Does the direction of the unfocused gaze indicate anything about which physical part of the brain is being utilized? Is ...
3
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1answer
147 views

Why do our senses evoke different subjective experiences

I'm wondering why there are different subjective experiences when our sensor systems are technically the same neurons that just get excited by different stuff (photons, soundwaves, ...). So why does ...
3
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2answers
948 views

What factors influence a person's perceived expertise?

For example, some people believe they are excellent human lie detectors. But, research shows that the average person is only able to detect deception about 54% of the time. What techniques could be ...
3
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2answers
1k views

Why does the the sight of gore causes nausea, vomiting and/or fainting?

Why is it that upon seeing anything the involves gore, e.g.: surgical cutting excessive blood blood and pain causes nausea, vomiting or fainting? And why does watching it repeatedly take away ...
3
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1answer
46 views

How can I create a set of comparable symbols of different shapes?

I was thinking about doing a small experiment during university course where participants have to answer a personality quiz and then they have to compare different symbols (like triangles, rectangles ...
3
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1answer
48 views

Is there a difference between the time/effort it takes for the blind and the sighted to learn to read Braille?

The visually deprived brain undergoes extensive remodeling due to cross-modal plasticity. This leads to increased areas of the cortex being available for other purposes such as tactile processing. Now ...
3
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1answer
101 views

How does the brain know whether or not it comprehends a novel concept?

There seem to be at least two kinds of confusion regarding novel concepts. In one, the brain simply can't form an abstract model from whatever information is being presented. It's where you can't ...
3
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1answer
79 views

How do certain frequencies of sound induce psychological states?

As one example, a specific low frequency beyond our hearing perception can make people feel nauseous and even vomit. I'm sure there are more documented studies surrounding the correlation of auditory ...
3
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1answer
89 views

Do unequal step sizes in staircase procedure affect the convergence?

Consider a psychophysics procedure using a standard staircase method to adaptively find the threshold, using a 2AFC paradigm and a 1-up, 3-down method to determine the 75% threshold. Now suppose the ...
3
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1answer
133 views

What is the psychology of notification colour?

After reading the question What is the impact of showing the amount of unattended notifications to the user, it occurred to me that many notifications (certainly not all) are red, two examples being ...