For questions regarding the organization and identification of transducted sensory information in the brain and its interpretation and consolidation in the mind

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6
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1answer
169 views

How is light processed by the human brain when awake and in dreams?

I've recently seen this great video: How your brain tells you where you are. The video discusses how certain cells within the brain fire based on proximity to objects. There are great examples of ...
6
votes
1answer
306 views

How much red/orange is needed to stimulate hunger?

A common claim thrown around is that red and orange are great for restaurants because it stimulates hunger. However, I've heard time and time again that this does not work in web design because you ...
6
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1answer
78 views

Has the inverted spectrum thought experiment ever been conducted (and if not, why)?

The inverted spectrum thought experiment posits that you (the subject) wake up one morning to find that your colour spectrum (or some part of it anyway) has inverted. This experiment has important ...
6
votes
2answers
258 views

How are humans able to read scrambled text/characters (e.g., CAPTCHA)?

So I'm doing a research on developing a new text-based CAPTCHA system. I've devised a scheme where characters in a text are broken/split individually and randomly, making it difficult for OCR machines ...
6
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1answer
92 views

What is an acquired taste?

Some foods are delicious. People love eating them, and the experience has a positive reinforcement. Thus, people will eat the food again. Some foods are instead "challenging", at least initially. For ...
6
votes
1answer
187 views

Is there any science behind movie/commercial camera angle changes?

Most of the regular waking cognition experiences a continuous visual field. One object of focus flows into another. Objects out of focus are pushed to the periphery. A person may move one's view ...
6
votes
1answer
216 views

Are there gender differences in color discrimination ability?

There appears to be a prevalent stereotype that girls seem to have "heightened" color perception. By this term, I mean that they can identify the salient features of different shades of color. ...
6
votes
3answers
198 views

How does appreciation for music change over time for the same person?

I know that there's a concept of acquired taste, where a child may find certain tastes, like peppers and beer unappealing until certain age or frequency of exposure. Is there something similar to ...
5
votes
1answer
860 views

How does the brain read rotated text?

Suppose a human ran across a letter written at a 45 degree angle. How does the brain read this text? Most people don't often see text written at an angle, so it seems safe to assume that the brain ...
5
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2answers
429 views

Minimum duration for presenting a visual stimulus on screen

My experiment involves presenting simple visual stimuli briefly on screen (200 ms to 1000 ms). The stimuli would be simple enough (e.g. a circle and a line) but I want to use a range of durations to ...
5
votes
2answers
239 views

What is the minimum angle off horizontal before a line visually appears inclined at first glance?

Here is a straight line, which visually looks like a straight line: At first look (lets say minimum 2–3 sec.) the line below looks straight, but after some time you can see that it is actually an ...
5
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1answer
186 views

Distortion of faces presented serially in peripheral vision

I've kind of already answered this question for myself, but I can't resist sharing it anyway. Please feel welcome to add anything you can in another answer. Stare at the cross in the middle and try ...
5
votes
1answer
77 views

Is there any evidence to support a correlation between how much bodily energy you are using, and how quickly time appears to pass?

It seems to me that time passes more slowly when I am drinking coffee, but when I stop, or I am tired it seems that time passes a lot faster. Could this have something to do with the sampling rate at ...
5
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2answers
121 views

Can our auditory perception be used to trick our visual perception?

"Our consciousness lags 80 milliseconds behind actual events...The 80-millisecond rule plays all sorts of perceptual tricks on us. As long as a hand-clapper is less than 30 meters away, you hear and ...
5
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2answers
46 views

Do we have a predisposition to view visual stimuli in a clockwise pattern?

I understand that we typically view the center of the image first and then are likely to move on a horizontal axis, but is there evidence that we tend to follow a clockwise path when viewing more ...
5
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1answer
176 views

Can tinnitus be measured with EEG or MEG?

Can tinnitus be measured with EEG or MEG (magnetoencephalography)? Is it visible in a power spectrum? In an ERP/ERF?
5
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1answer
532 views

What is the relative importance of shape and color in object recognition?

Do people recognize objects faster when both shape and color are present? Can color introduce more cognitive load to identify the object? Let's say there is a row of icons. Users need to quickly (no ...
5
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1answer
77 views

Binocular rivalry in animals?

Are there any experiments on binocular rivalry in animals? (In humans, brain responses to Rubin's vase are for example well studied.)
5
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1answer
273 views

Are there any free databases of audio-visual emotional stimuli (English)?

I am particularly interested in naturalistic and induced emotional content. I have found the SAVEE, the HUMAINE and the SEMAINE databases. I have read through the Terms for LDC (UPenn) and it seems ...
5
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2answers
134 views

Inducing Auditory-to-Visual Synesthesia

I recently watched an interesting video that was discussing conveying color to the blind through language. It implied that there may be a way to insert the sensation of color into a person's mind via ...
5
votes
1answer
751 views

Closure, an actual psychology term relating to filling in information?

I'm currently reading a book called "Understand Comics" and a term has come up called closure. I've understood this concept before and the book describes closure as the process the brain goes through ...
5
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0answers
46 views

Current directions in emulation theory

Over the decades there have been several theories from various aspects of cognitive science that have appealed to a link between perception and action as a way of understanding information processing ...
5
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0answers
58 views

What neurological processes occur with 'revulsion'?

As the title asks, what neurological processes occur when we feel revulsion? By revulsion, I mean the involuntary and voluntary physical and psychological responses far stronger than the aversion ...
4
votes
1answer
1k views

How do we get used to smells?

How do we get used to smells? For example, you walk into a room with a certain stench, but it seems no matter how strong it may be, spending enough time in the room will allow you to stop smelling ...
4
votes
1answer
900 views

When counting a given letter in sentences, why do people tend to omit occurrences in certain common words?

I have noticed that when I, and presumably others, count the number of times the letter F appears in the following passage: ...
4
votes
1answer
78 views

Name of a cognitive test assessing whether a child can think independently

I am looking for a names / examples of a tests that determine if the child is thinking on its own (I have tried searching on wikipedia topics about cognitive sciences/ psychology etc. with no luck). ...
4
votes
1answer
108 views

Can the brain work better in stressful conditions?

I was watching a documentary about the brain the other day, BBC's Human Body - Brain Power. It said that the perception power of the brain increases when you are in a tense situation. For example; if ...
4
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2answers
210 views

Can ESP and out-of-body phenomena be understood as a form of dreaming or hallucination?

Currently reading about psychedelic experiences, and it is noted in Wikipedia that: Level 4 psychedelic experience Strong hallucinations, i.e. objects morphing into other objects. ...
4
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1answer
79 views

What are the main theories that account for why some people like X and others not? [closed]

For example, how does psychology account for why some people like peanuts and others hate them? This is a serious question, although perhaps naive. Sure, there can be some physiological explanations ...
4
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2answers
203 views

Which physical properties of a stimulus can a human attend to?

I am not only curious about speech, but for concreteness in illustrating my question, I consider the case of speech perception. Assume a listener is presented with an acoustic waveform. The wave ...
4
votes
1answer
3k views

Why do humans' eyes enter an unfocused gaze when recalling a memory or imagining something?

The question is self-explanatory (I hope). Is this trait unique to humans? Does the direction of the unfocused gaze indicate anything about which physical part of the brain is being utilized? Is ...
4
votes
1answer
48 views

What is the phenomenon that one can recognize a movie after seeing a scene for a fraction of second called?

I have experiences that while I was walking around the street, I saw a scene on a TV for a fraction of second, and I instantly recognized the correspondent movie. This is very interesting since at the ...
4
votes
1answer
57 views

Is there a difference between the time/effort it takes for the blind and the sighted to learn to read Braille?

The visually deprived brain undergoes extensive remodeling due to cross-modal plasticity. This leads to increased areas of the cortex being available for other purposes such as tactile processing. Now ...
4
votes
1answer
31 views

What study showed that humans can successfully detect objects within images once they are able to recognize those objects?

A professor in an online lecture I was watching referenced a study which he said showed that our ability as humans to detect objects within scenes (especially complex scenes) was very much connected ...
4
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1answer
116 views

Psychology behind repeated viewing of certain pictures and songs

Often it happens that we like to frequently listen to a particular tune or song or view some pictures or images repeatedly time after time. What are the reasons and psychology behind this?
4
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1answer
87 views

How do certain frequencies of sound induce psychological states?

As one example, a specific low frequency beyond our hearing perception can make people feel nauseous and even vomit. I'm sure there are more documented studies surrounding the correlation of auditory ...
4
votes
1answer
238 views

Can people alleviate a negative halo effect about them?

According to Wikipedia: "The halo effect or halo error is a cognitive bias in which one's judgments of a person’s character can be influenced by one's overall impression of him or her." ...
4
votes
1answer
48 views

Study of recollection of drawings based on labels

I remember stumbling across a very interesting study/experiment a few months ago. Now I want to try to find it again. Unfortunately I cannot for the life of me recall the name of the experiment nor ...
4
votes
1answer
81 views

How do people respond to auditory warning signals?

I am working on a literature review of total reaction time to an auditory alert, in a transport context. All of the literature I can find about perception-response times are in the context of visual ...
4
votes
1answer
479 views

Possibility of using the effects of sleep to induce a virtual environment?

I'm not sure what this guy is trying to say, or why his question got closed, but I think I can build upon it and form a solid question. When the brain enters REM Sleep, all sensory input to reality is ...
4
votes
1answer
71 views

Why different responses to target and distractor in three-stimulus oddball procedure?

In the three-stimulus oddball procedure, there is an infrequent target in a background of frequently occurring standard stimuli and infrequently occurring distracter stimuli. My question is, since the ...
4
votes
1answer
130 views

How effective are high audio frequencies in commercials in getting audience attention?

Does anyone know of a peer reviewed article that describes how commercials will often contain high audio frequencies in order to attract the viewer's attention? Referrals to commercials using any ...
4
votes
1answer
111 views

Is there terminology for perceptual illusions at the moment that figure-ground reversal occurs?

I'm looking for a term in the perception / cognition area of research. I recently saw this visual illusion that 'flips' what is negative-space and what is positive-space. This is known in the arts ...
4
votes
1answer
48 views

Quantifying chromatic adaptations made by the brain

What are the ways one can use to measure the kind of adaptations done by the brain to provide colour constancy? Has this been done before?
4
votes
1answer
67 views

When does anchoring improve our judgement?

Anchoring is the behavioral pattern where the first piece of information we receive about a situation is what all other data points are compared to. For example, the price of the first menu item we ...
4
votes
1answer
92 views

What human limitations are there to object tracking and recognition?

I'm thinking about trying to implement object recognition/tracking using a silicon retina (also known as the Dynamic Vision Sensor) and using the Semantic Pointer Architecture as my cognitive model. ...
4
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0answers
39 views

Do people perceive opacity of a color linearly?

I am trying to create a visualization for some numbers, each ranging from 0 to 1. I was thinking of representing each number by a color (say red) of a certain opacity corresponding to its value. For ...
4
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0answers
42 views

Why do I see those static pictures as they are moving [duplicate]

Have a look at the following static pictures: There are more of them here. On the same website this PDF describes findings.However I could not find any explanation why this phenomenon happening. ...
4
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0answers
36 views

Learning Reading without Speech?

I have this question from wandering how a person, who does not have speech capability or is isolated from people who speaks, could learn how to read? Will a language (A) like English or (B) like ...
4
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0answers
73 views

The accuracy & malleability of memory for color

How accurate is colour memory for the standard person? It would seem most people are quite good at remembering the colour of objects by visualising the object. But in some cases peoples visualisation ...