For questions regarding the organization and identification of transducted sensory information in the brain and its interpretation and consolidation in the mind

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5
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3answers
224 views

Why does your recorded or objective voice sound different to what you hear in your own head?

When speaking, I hear my own voice very differently from how others do and from what it really is. The sound differs in tone, pitch, volume, etc. For example, recordings of my singing or speaking in ...
1
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0answers
502 views

Can observing a composite photo of one's own face have an impact on own personality?

A while back I created an iPhone app that helps me create a composite like the one below. Can observing such a composite have an impact of attributing the qualities perceived in the composite to ...
3
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0answers
49 views

How does human brain pick out the most likely representation of object when an object is ambiguous?

For example, it is dim light and an object is in partial shade, hiding some features of an object. It is a rounded, dark brownish object. The object is rather ambiguous - it could be a rock, a potato, ...
3
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2answers
76 views

Binary classification as a cognitive strategy?

Is there any research investigating whether the human cognitive system has a tendency to reduce complex systems or spectra of data in terms of binary contrast? There are many common-sense dual ...
3
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0answers
56 views

Progress on Arnheim's perceptual forces in vision

In the second edition of Rudolf Arnheim's Art and Visual Perception: A Psychology of the Creative Eye, published in 1974, the opening chapter on "balance" begins with a discussion of "perceptual ...
5
votes
1answer
92 views

What delay between two audio sources is seen as “noticeable” to most people?

I'm completing a project that involves synchronising two audio sources over a network, and I need to find some figures that represent what kind delay would be seen as "noticeable". I've tried ...
3
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1answer
60 views

Can time be perceived differently depending on a user's feeling?

You often hear that time passes more quickly when you're having fun. And the opposite is also "true" in common belief, that when you're bored time is very slow. But we know that time is almost linear ...
2
votes
3answers
270 views

Is there some hierarchy of the human senses?

What I mean by this is to ask if each of the sensory inputs can be quantified by the amount of information the brain is receiving: For example, Brain says: currently receiving 10 packets of visual ...
3
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2answers
94 views

Does the time required to read a word grow linearly with the number of characters?

I recently installed a speed reader on my tablet. Now I wonder how the minimal time needed to read an $N$-letter word grows. There was this previous question on the relationship between sentence ...
9
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2answers
205 views

Does perception have a “frame rate”?

Are the objects of visual perception processes divisible into individual, still frames, like video is? If so: Are the perceptions from different senses synced to the same frequency? Are these ...
2
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3answers
144 views

How to run “inhibition of return” experiments online?

Are there online platforms for running inhibition of return experiments? I want to analyze different cultural groups and an online platform would be the only way to do so.
8
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2answers
206 views

Can the daily use of two or more languages impact cognitive capacity?

I've read the following threads: Is it possible to think in a second language? Does language and/or culture affect an individual's cognitive capacity? is it possible to think without language? ...
3
votes
2answers
654 views

Why does the the sight of gore causes nausea, vomiting and/or fainting?

Why is it that upon seeing anything the involves gore, e.g.: surgical cutting excessive blood blood and pain causes nausea, vomiting or fainting? And why does watching it repeatedly take away ...
10
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3answers
407 views

Why is an image of a face without features disturbing?

Below is a snapshot of an article linked from LinkedIn today. What I find more disturbing than the topic at hand is the featured image used to head up the article. Clearly it's important to provide ...
6
votes
4answers
223 views

is it possible to think without language?

I'm trying to fathom what it might be like for a person with aphasia and for one with agnosia. For a person with a visual agnosia I wonder this: if two unrecognizable objects are shown to them, and ...
2
votes
3answers
99 views

Is this some sort of soft-coded Grapheme-Color synethesia?

I just found this remarkable optical illusion: To do: Fixate your gaze on the center of one of the figures and stare at it for some time (20-30 seconds) while it cycles (without moving your eyes). ...
3
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3answers
142 views

What is a scientifically plausible method by which people might in the future be able to read minds? [closed]

I am writing a book. It will be post-apocalyptic, and the apocalypse I'm thinking of will involve people being able to read each other's mind. Can any of you give me a slightly plausible reason that ...
1
vote
2answers
56 views

Is there some effect that forces humans to judge things and people according to the conception of their own image?

I remember of having read that such effects do exist, but I don't remember where. If that is true or if the hypothesis exist, I'd like to have references about it.
5
votes
1answer
103 views

Can tinnitus be measured with EEG or MEG?

Can tinnitus be measured with EEG or MEG (magnetoencephalography)? Is it visible in a power spectrum? In an ERP/ERF?
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0answers
37 views

Is unsweetened tea 'stronger' than sweetened tea [closed]

I feel that if I have unsweetened tea, it has a stronger hit. i.e. it is more stimulating than a similar cup of tea in which some sugar has been added. I can say the same about coffee. Is it just me ...
2
votes
1answer
73 views

Is all vision based on movement?

This is something I recall from a class on human perception: vision is based on "movement" or change in what hits receptors, so if your eyes were perfectly still you couldn't see, but always-present ...