For questions about the biology of the nervous system, from a macroscopic to microscopic perspective.

learn more… | top users | synonyms (1)

1
vote
1answer
4 views

Relation of field of view and HVS with distance from fovea

I have read somewhere that Our visual perception degrades non-linearly with distance from the fovea. However, it was not referenced. I was wondering if there is a reference talking about ...
0
votes
0answers
14 views

Can normal brain activity arise from no (or random) brain activity?

I wonder how state the brain as a dynamical system is. In other words, how important the state (current activation) of the brain is for its further functioning. Of course the brain controls vital ...
4
votes
1answer
59 views

Can LSD connect sensory regions in the brain?

How is it possible that after using LSD you can hear sounds and see colours? I have my own experience with this phenomenon. When I´m lying totally relaxed in bed and suddenly a door is closed ...
2
votes
1answer
18 views

What is the storage capacity of the human brain?

Theories have emerged that attempt to quantize the data storage capacity of a neural network. The brain is a very large neural network. So, what is the storage capacity of the brain? (Posted from ...
8
votes
2answers
94 views

Is the split-brain, dual consciousness experiment from Rhawn Joseph valid?

I have been reading about the problem of possible dual consciousness in split brain patients and I came across this wikipedia page. In the "other experiments" section, the two last paragraphs about ...
3
votes
2answers
42 views

Do studies exist that can map specimens of neocortex to the functions they perform(ed) in vivo?

Much brain research has proposed that the brain (the neocortex, esp.) is set up in areas - an area for faces, an area for language, etc.. The experiments typically go 1) damage an area 2) observe ...
6
votes
1answer
60 views

How much of brain power consumption is for information

As previously answered on this site, the brain uses 20W of power. However, how much of this power consumption is for information processing and how much of it is for maintenance of biological ...
1
vote
0answers
66 views

Does a person really have free will? [closed]

Psychology and other cognitive sciences study human thoughts and emotions as reflections to biological operations. These operations are involuntary and thus result in determined behaviour. Does this ...
3
votes
1answer
30 views

What is the function of the connection between the two halves of the thalamus?

What kind of direct exchange do we have between the two halves of the thalamus, whether going through the thalamic adhesion or not? Do we know what parts of left and right thalamus are connected and ...
2
votes
1answer
20 views

What is the definition of a receptive field?

I have read the wikipedia article on receptive fields (RFs). There, a receptive field is defined as: The receptive field of an individual sensory neuron is the particular region of the sensory ...
3
votes
1answer
23 views

What is the location of the center-surround receptive fields of retinal ganglion cells?

I have read wikipedia article about receptive fields of visual system and it states the following: The receptive field is often identified as the region of the retina where the action of light ...
0
votes
0answers
19 views

What neuronal circuits are known to exist in the cortex? [closed]

I'm looking for publications and/or researchers studying neuronal circuits that are found in the cortex, in particular the language regions of human brain. So far i only came across detailed ...
9
votes
2answers
358 views

Do all types of synapses in the brain change based on spike-timing-dependent plasticity?

Synapses likely change their strengths based on a form of spike-timing-dependent plasticity. Is this true for all types of synapses in all parts of the human brain? I wonder if there are also synapses ...
1
vote
0answers
14 views

How does aggression transferring work neurologically?

Psychologist often prefict phenomena before they are scientifically observed. For example they have known for a long time that if you don't think about something for some time, you forget it. This can ...
5
votes
1answer
55 views

How does architecture impact cognition and mental health?

Research indicates that scenic, natural environments positively impact human health and mental well-being [1][2]. But what about the impact of man-made architecture and various architectural styles on ...
6
votes
1answer
60 views

Is the ordering of Brodmann areas arbitrary?

A single Brodmann area is defined based off cellular composition. Are the Brodmann areas ordinal, and if so for what reason? (e.g. is there something that makes Brodmann area 1 the "first one", and ...
2
votes
1answer
41 views

Can neuron change from excitatory to inhibitory (end vice versa) over time?

According to this answer a neuron can release only specific type of neurotransmitters at the time, however, could it change over time? For example a neuron that now releases only inhibitory ...
3
votes
1answer
24 views

Voltage sensitive dyes technique: What is the underlying measure?

I just discovered voltage sensitive dyes technique: I have seen that figures are labelled with dF/F0, what does it stands for?
4
votes
1answer
37 views

Can one neuron spike inhibit and excite at the same time?

Is it possible to have a neuron that in some synapses releases inhibitory neurotransmitters and excitatory in others (everything triggered by the same spike) ?
0
votes
0answers
17 views

A state model of sodium channels

I am studying by myself Human Physiology. I have encountered the following question: In the following given model of sodium channel with 3 states open closed blocked (which I assume means ...
1
vote
1answer
40 views

What prevents a neuron from activating an incoming synapse?

As is known, a neuron can have incoming and outgoing synapses. When a neuron fires, what does prevent that only outgoing synapses are activated?
31
votes
5answers
23k views

Why would the brain flip the images perceived by your eyes?

The following is a common scientific statement, which you don't have to google long for to find: The eye views images upside-down in the manner of a camera lens, but our brains reinterpret this ...
5
votes
0answers
14 views

Voltage sensitive dyes technique: 2-photons microscopy vs confocal microscopy

I just discovered voltage sensitive dyes technique and I was wondering what would be the advantage to use 2-photons microscopy compared to confocal microscopy? They are both fluorescent techniques ...
1
vote
0answers
22 views

Can a neuron fire when hyperpolarized?

Is there any chance that a neuron could fire when hyperpolarized? In that case the spike would probably be different than usual?
7
votes
2answers
24k views

Why are some people unable to easily memorize the lyrics to a song?

Although I have listened some songs hundred of times I can't sing the lyrics to any of these songs from beginning to end without pauses. However I am able to whistle the whole song without difficulty. ...
3
votes
1answer
217 views

Does the human visual system implement (adaptive) histogram equalization?

The human visual system is very good at 'cancelling out' shadows and other lightning effects, and focusing on the contrast in images. A famous example of this is Adelson's checker shadow illusion: ...
1
vote
0answers
18 views

Analysing ERP (Event-Related Potentials from EEG recordings in fucus on P-300 waves

I am trying to understand how to analyze ERP (Event-Related Potentials) from EEG recordings in fucus on P-300 waves. I have come up with a few questions which I hope you might be able to help with: ...
0
votes
0answers
19 views

Which brain structure or function cannot be studied using neuroimaging techniques?

Considering CT, PET, MRI, fMRI, EEG, MEG, DWI, and DTI techniques, is there any structure or function of the brain that cannot be determined and studied using regular imaging techniques? My first ...
9
votes
2answers
7k views

Which neurotransmitters can be measured in a living human brain?

I'm interested in learning more about the modern techniques that are used for scientific studies of neurotransmitters in the living human brain. As far as I know, there are 4 neuromodulator systems ...
3
votes
1answer
52 views

Do dissolving myelinated connections explain learning?

In order to understand how we get rid of established habits/behavior: Can myelinated connections be dissolved or are new connections created that bypass those connections?
3
votes
0answers
29 views

How does the hippocampus and the “Papez” circuit form a memory?

It is admitted the hippocampus is necessary to the formation of new long term memories. At first, information goes back and forth between various parts of the cortex and the hippocampus. That's how a ...
4
votes
0answers
24 views

Does testosterone level cause more sexual dream content?

I have long been interested in dreaming, including how dream content can shed some light on brain chemistry. I did a search on the subject of testosterone levels altering dream content and see some ...
0
votes
0answers
14 views

The number of dendrites versus axon terminals [closed]

Refer to this answer, I know there are thousands of dendrites make thousands connections, and only multiple axon terminals. Normally, connections (synapse) are classical axon-dendritic synapses which ...
6
votes
2answers
128 views

Does electricity pass through synapse?

As far as I understand, when a neuron fires the action potential generated in a cell body reaches only the presynaptic part of the synapse, then triggers the transmitter to pass through the gap, and ...
6
votes
0answers
38 views

Does the brain generate identical words in different languages similarly?

Saying (or even just thinking) a word or phrase results from activity in multiple regions of your brain. Of course, we can measure/'map' this activity to some degree; From wikipedia: EEG measures ...
1
vote
1answer
45 views

Is the amount of learning modulated by reward transmitters?

The human brain is a signal processing system. Input streams contain sensory, motor, reward and possibly more signals mixed. I wonder if neuro transmitters associated with reward increase or decrease ...
5
votes
1answer
60 views

How / when does neurogenesis occur while learning?

I've heard that learning to Juggle (new things) helps increase neurogenesis. So, what does it depend on? Does it have to be a physical skill only? Or can I study / read about Economics(which is ...
0
votes
1answer
19 views

Do gating mechanisms in the neocortex have individual degrees for all gated connections?

For example, the upward connection between layers in the neocortex flows through the Thalamus which is assumed to have a gating function. I wonder whether there is a single value per gate, ...
2
votes
4answers
93 views

What are the rules that govern neuron behavior?

This is what I know so far: Neurons are nodes with a number called the threshold. Neurons are connected to other neurons through directed axons. Axons take the signals produced by neurons and ...
1
vote
0answers
28 views

Which hormones are known to cause which psychological effects?

This might be a very broad question, but I'm looking for gathering a list of any hormone that can cause psychological effects - especially long-term. I would like to build a list of psychological ...
4
votes
0answers
39 views

How common is it for twins conjoined at the head to share thoughts and visual stimuli?

I've always been interested in the possibility of a pair of conjoined twins, joined at the head, being able to read each other's thoughts, react to stimuli that one of them can't see/hear/feel, and ...
5
votes
1answer
72 views

How far can a signal travel in the neocortex without passing through the white matter?

Correct me if I am wrong please, from what I understand horizontal communication spans very short distance in all layers of the neocortex but layers I and II. In these two layers dendrites and axons ...
2
votes
1answer
42 views

How long does a spiking signal last?

It is surprisingly hard to find information about the timing of neurons, in particular how long an action potential can contribute to the summation of a neuron. Is it on the order of milliseconds or ...
2
votes
0answers
20 views

What is the role of non-synaptic plasticity in learning and memory?

Is non-synaptic plasticity (e.g. changes in the spike threshold) believed to play a large role in learning and memory? If so, which roles are these effects believed to play?
3
votes
1answer
29 views

Publicly Available NEURON models

NEURON is a software package for simulating neurons and networks in great detail. Although it's quite easy to find papers that use NEURON with a simple Google Scholar search, is there some way to find ...
0
votes
2answers
104 views

If orgasm triggers bonding and feelings of love, why don't people continue to stay in love?

I am a bit confused by the effects of orgasm in bonding; everything I seem to read seems to be a bit careless with the truth and does not mention why people fall out of love or why people who are in ...
0
votes
2answers
39 views

What causes dopamine in our body [closed]

I was curious as to know what are the natural causes for the secretion of dopamine in our body. Are there any specific foods that increases the dopamine level? It is said that dopamine are usually ...
4
votes
1answer
87 views

When does reward occur? When dopamine is released or when it is binded?

I know this is a silly question, but I'm curious as to what is the exact phase when we experience of the thrill of doing an exciting activity. I believe this briefly describes the whole process. So, ...
1
vote
1answer
33 views

What is input resistance and how to interpret its values?

For example, this site gives a distribution of values of the input resistance of various cells. The values are in MOhms. The definition says that "input resistance measured at steady-state voltage ...
2
votes
1answer
47 views

During synchronized waves oscillation (alpha beta etc…) do neurons fire only once for each wave cycle?

Or can they fire few times then pause and again, firefew times and pause periodically? If the second case happens then do we know if the neurons that fire in synchronity fire the same number of ...