For questions about the biology of the nervous system, from a macroscopic to microscopic perspective.

learn more… | top users | synonyms (1)

1
vote
0answers
32 views

Why do thoughts take a non-zero length of time?

I was staring blankly at my desk thinking about how to overcome a programming task at work when it suddenly dawned on me I had spent the best part of half an hour trying to envision how this problem ...
0
votes
0answers
3 views

Can lithium withdrawal cause parathesia upon withdrawal?

Why would paresthesia develop after an individual is withdrawn from lithium due to chronic critical toxicity and continue for a protracted period of time? Is this a result of some kind of damage or ...
0
votes
1answer
24 views

If light travels at c, and the human nervous system's speed/perception speed<c, why aren't we not seeing or blind at some times? [closed]

If light travels at c, and the human nervous system is a lot slower than light speed, therefore it would take a lot of time for us to process what we see, why aren't we blind to what's going around us ...
3
votes
1answer
57 views

What is the role of (why )universal gas constant in Nernst equation?

The Nernst equation is an equation that relates the the total voltage, i.e. the electromotive force, of the full cell at any point in time to the standard electrode potential, temperature, activity, ...
-1
votes
0answers
15 views

Male Andropause fake or real [closed]

There are many people that would suggest testosterone supplement would be beneficial in your later mature years. I have a publically available study from the Australian library. 10,000 participant's ...
-1
votes
1answer
16 views

Neurons - Firing-Rate and Task? [closed]

I plan to build a neural network that is as near as possible to a biological one. So I have 2 questions regarding properties of neurons in the brain and their types: What is the firing rate (average)...
0
votes
2answers
31 views

Neurons - Which Types, How much Inputs/Outputs?

I plan to build a neural network that is as near as possible to a biological one. So I have 2 questions regarding properties of neurons in the brain and their types: What types are there and where ...
3
votes
1answer
30 views

Membrane resistance of a neuron

I am about to simulate a neuron activity with the "Leaky Integrate and Fire" neuron model. But for that I need the membrane resistance. I was really looking a lot online, but I just cant find a value. ...
3
votes
1answer
42 views

Can “fire together, wire together” be undone?

Are new connections continuously forged in the adult human brain, or do we just start all wired together and then prune until we have something we like?
1
vote
0answers
19 views

Brain cell temperature [closed]

Given: a brain cell has an average temperature, T. If: perpetual brain activity pattern, X ; has an average conductive resistance, R; Therefore: Could it be rationally assumed that activity ...
6
votes
1answer
80 views

Is a network of neurons the only factor in memory?

Background I'm actually writing a science fiction novel set a couple decades in the future. Brains are not my field. I've done as much research as I could. In the story, the protagonist finds out he ...
9
votes
1answer
479 views

How do we hear our inner voice?

How do we perceive inner speech? Does it follow the same neural pathways as normal acoustic speech? If yes, what is the extent of overlap between the two neural pathways?
1
vote
0answers
38 views

Mechanism of ketamine in treatment of depression and anxiety?

What are the mechanisms by which ketamine reduces the symptoms of depression and anxiety?
5
votes
0answers
63 views

Does STDP make the Hebbian learning rule redundant?

On Scholarpedia they introduce STDP (spike timing dependent plasticity) as a temporally asymmetric form of Hebbian learning, making it sound as if the original Hebbian rule still has relevance in ...
4
votes
0answers
54 views

Does increased motor development always occur at the expense of speech development, or vice versa?

It is often said that infants / toddlers* develop in a focused manner. I am specifically interested in the notion that a quick development of speech occurs at the expense of motor skill development ...
6
votes
1answer
224 views

How does the inner ear encode sound intensity?

Different areas of the inner ear (the cochlea) are sensitive to different acoustic frequencies. Hence, the cochlea basically performs a fast Fourier transform on the audio signal. This spectral ...
3
votes
1answer
58 views

How do neurons limit their input current?

I know that many neurons have an input current-spiking frequency (I-F) relationships, e.g. as seen here. However, all the I-F curves I've encountered show the input current in a fairly small range (...
6
votes
2answers
114 views

What's the relation between firing of dopaminergic neurons and dopamine dispersion in terms of neurophysiological processes?

Question: How does the firing of dopaminergic neurons affect the dispersal of dopamine? Evidence of my limited familiarity with dopaminergic neurons and motivation for asking the question: Most of ...
9
votes
1answer
160 views

Does a split brain affect the inner voice?

In the Nature link provided, split brain reportedly alters the processing of sensory input (e.g., an aberrant performance on monocular visual tasks under laboratory conditions), and impairs motor ...
2
votes
1answer
58 views

Does oxytocin reduce brain activity?

In the book "Psychologie" by Richard J. Gerrig, Philip Zimbardo I read there are studies claiming that: "die gegenwärtige Forschung legt nahe, dass das Hormon eine facettenreiche Rolle bei ...
3
votes
1answer
75 views

How do people with a split brain experience reality?

Some people with severe epileptic seizures have the connection between their two brain halves cut. How appears reality for them, and why does this procedure helps them?
5
votes
1answer
51 views

What is the relationship between visual attention network and visual stream (Two-streams hypothesis)?

There are two visual attention networks proposed by Maurizio Corbetta and Gordon L. Shulman (2002). These are top-down and bottom-up attention networks. One system, which includes parts of the ...
3
votes
2answers
129 views

Can normal brain activity arise from no (or random) brain activity?

I wonder how stable the brain is as a dynamical system. In other words, how important the state (current activation) of the brain is for its further functioning. Would the brain recover from a state ...
2
votes
1answer
27 views

What is the relation of visual quality and distance from the central field of view?

I have read somewhere that Our visual perception degrades non-linearly with distance from the fovea. However, it was not referenced. I was wondering if there is a reference talking about this?...
2
votes
1answer
32 views

What is the purpose of non-spiking and anaxonic neurons?

What is the purpose of non-spiking neurons and anaxonic neurons in neural tissue?
5
votes
1answer
48 views

Why can't hemineglect patients be trained to actively pay attention to their neglected side?

I'm still having a hard time understanding the symptoms of hemineglect, mainly because perception and attention has been two peas of a pod for most of my experiences. A Scholarpedia article states ...
3
votes
1answer
39 views

What is the function of the connection between the two halves of the thalamus?

What kind of direct exchange do we have between the two halves of the thalamus, whether going through the thalamic adhesion or not? Do we know what parts of left and right thalamus are connected and ...
1
vote
0answers
72 views

Does a person really have free will? [closed]

Psychology and other cognitive sciences study human thoughts and emotions as reflections to biological operations. These operations are involuntary and thus result in determined behaviour. Does this ...
1
vote
0answers
17 views

How does aggression transferring work neurologically?

Psychologist often prefict phenomena before they are scientifically observed. For example they have known for a long time that if you don't think about something for some time, you forget it. This can ...
5
votes
1answer
60 views

How does architecture impact cognition and mental health?

Research indicates that scenic, natural environments positively impact human health and mental well-being [1][2]. But what about the impact of man-made architecture and various architectural styles on ...
5
votes
2answers
111 views

Can LSD connect sensory regions in the brain?

How is it possible that after using LSD you can hear sounds and see colours? I have my own experience with this phenomenon. When I´m lying totally relaxed in bed and suddenly a door is closed loudly,...
3
votes
1answer
55 views

Can neuron change from excitatory to inhibitory (end vice versa) over time?

According to this answer a neuron can release only specific type of neurotransmitters at the time, however, could it change over time? For example a neuron that now releases only inhibitory ...
5
votes
0answers
14 views

Voltage sensitive dyes technique: 2-photons microscopy vs confocal microscopy

I just discovered voltage sensitive dyes technique and I was wondering what would be the advantage to use 2-photons microscopy compared to confocal microscopy? They are both fluorescent techniques ...
4
votes
1answer
39 views

Can one neuron spike inhibit and excite at the same time?

Is it possible to have a neuron that in some synapses releases inhibitory neurotransmitters and excitatory in others (everything triggered by the same spike) ?
2
votes
2answers
54 views

Can a hyperpolarized neuron fire action potentials?

Is there any chance that a neuron could fire when hyperpolarized? In that case, would the spike be different than usual?
2
votes
1answer
51 views

What prevents a neuron from activating an incoming synapse?

As is known, a neuron can have incoming and outgoing synapses. When a neuron fires, what does prevent that only outgoing synapses are activated?
3
votes
1answer
24 views

Voltage sensitive dyes technique: What is the underlying measure?

I just discovered voltage sensitive dyes technique: I have seen that figures are labelled with dF/F0, what does it stands for?
9
votes
2answers
371 views

Do all types of synapses in the brain change based on spike-timing-dependent plasticity?

Synapses likely change their strengths based on a form of spike-timing-dependent plasticity. Is this true for all types of synapses in all parts of the human brain? I wonder if there are also synapses ...
3
votes
1answer
220 views

Does the human visual system implement (adaptive) histogram equalization?

The human visual system is very good at 'cancelling out' shadows and other lightning effects, and focusing on the contrast in images. A famous example of this is Adelson's checker shadow illusion: ...
4
votes
0answers
31 views

Does testosterone level cause more sexual dream content?

I have long been interested in dreaming, including how dream content can shed some light on brain chemistry. I did a search on the subject of testosterone levels altering dream content and see some ...
3
votes
0answers
31 views

How does the hippocampus and the “Papez” circuit form a memory?

It is admitted the hippocampus is necessary to the formation of new long term memories. At first, information goes back and forth between various parts of the cortex and the hippocampus. That's how a ...
6
votes
2answers
134 views

Does electricity pass through synapse?

As far as I understand, when a neuron fires the action potential generated in a cell body reaches only the presynaptic part of the synapse, then triggers the transmitter to pass through the gap, and ...
1
vote
1answer
45 views

Is the amount of learning modulated by reward transmitters?

The human brain is a signal processing system. Input streams contain sensory, motor, reward and possibly more signals mixed. I wonder if neuro transmitters associated with reward increase or decrease ...
1
vote
1answer
28 views

Is there visual focus during a saccade?

Has anyone succeeded in measuring where the focus is between saccades? Through some kind of nonintrusive brainscan perhaps? I would like to be able to draw with my thought :) (Something similar would ...
5
votes
1answer
65 views

How / when does neurogenesis occur while learning?

I've heard that learning to Juggle (new things) helps increase neurogenesis. So, what does it depend on? Does it have to be a physical skill only? Or can I study / read about Economics(which is ...
6
votes
1answer
61 views

Is the ordering of Brodmann areas arbitrary?

A single Brodmann area is defined based off cellular composition. Are the Brodmann areas ordinal, and if so for what reason? (e.g. is there something that makes Brodmann area 1 the "first one", and ...
1
vote
0answers
36 views

Which hormones are known to cause which psychological effects? [closed]

This might be a very broad question, but I'm looking for gathering a list of any hormone that can cause psychological effects - especially long-term. I would like to build a list of psychological ...
2
votes
0answers
21 views

What is the role of non-synaptic plasticity in learning and memory?

Is non-synaptic plasticity (e.g. changes in the spike threshold) believed to play a large role in learning and memory? If so, which roles are these effects believed to play?
2
votes
1answer
44 views

How long does a spiking signal last?

It is surprisingly hard to find information about the timing of neurons, in particular how long an action potential can contribute to the summation of a neuron. Is it on the order of milliseconds or ...
6
votes
0answers
41 views

Does the brain generate identical words in different languages similarly?

Saying (or even just thinking) a word or phrase results from activity in multiple regions of your brain. Of course, we can measure/'map' this activity to some degree; From wikipedia: EEG measures ...