For questions about the encoding, storage, and retrieval of information in the brain. This tag encompasses research all the way from the molecular level in model organisms to abstract mathematical representations, and includes applied learning paradigms and tasks.

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7
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1answer
89 views

PTSD based on false memories

Memory is not just static snapshots or video on a harddrive, but an active process. As such, it is possible to construct false memories (Brainerd & Reyna, 2005). Some of these false memories can ...
3
votes
1answer
85 views

Do different methods of testing memory for character sequences result in different brain activation?

Assume a certain sequence of N characters, displayed on a screen one by one, that should be memorized. The speed of the display is such that it doesn't produce much extra stress. You may assume that ...
2
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1answer
33 views

Do hints improve memorization when using spaced repetition?

For example, I'm learning Geography using spaced repetition technique. I have some program which asks me questions like "In which country Melbourne is located?", and I have to recall the country ...
1
vote
1answer
123 views

Where do our memories get stored and how are they retrieved again?

In one of Karl Lashley's 1950 papers, it is pointed out that information is not stored locally in certain area of the brain. Instead, it's stored distributively over the structure of the brain. I'm ...
6
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0answers
50 views

Difference between Logan's Instance theory and Exemplar-Based Random Walk (EBRW) theory

I'm trying to find a clear explanation of the difference between Logan's instance theory (Logan, 2002) and the Exemplar-Based Random Walk theory (Nosofsky & Palmari, 1997). Am I mistaken that they ...
6
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0answers
111 views

Is abstract knowledge incompatible with literal memorization?

Let me describe 2 interesting cases : Solomon Shereshevsky (Luria, 1968 - the Mind of a Mnemonist) had an almost perfect literal memory. He remembers strings of hundreds of digits for years after ...
6
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0answers
126 views

Chunking Patterns and Enjoyment of Applying Patterns

I've been reading a book "The Theory of Fun in Game Design" it talks about two concepts of psychology that I wanted to confirm are true. The writer the book isn't a psychologist. The two concepts ...
5
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0answers
52 views

Is there a way to avoid false memories?

I saw a video on how interrogators used manipulation on the victim/criminal which lead to innocent people being arrested and one way of doing that was using false memories in which the person was ...
4
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0answers
22 views

Do distractors create false learning in multiple choice questions?

I use quizzes in teaching, but have started to worry that they do more harm than good. Here's why: We have all learned from "the testing effect" that the act of taking a test is part of the practice ...
4
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0answers
43 views

Long term effects of using modafinil on cognition

What are the Long term effects of using stimulant like modafinil on cognition abilty?
4
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0answers
35 views

What's the most effective way to learn and revise foreign language vocabulary?

Google searches have suggested to me that some sore of spaced repetition should work best, keeping in mind Ebbinghaus's "Forgetting Curve". However, it is not clear to me exactly when I should ...
4
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0answers
61 views

The accuracy & malleability of memory for color

How accurate is colour memory for the standard person? It would seem most people are quite good at remembering the colour of objects by visualising the object. But in some cases peoples visualisation ...
4
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0answers
38 views

The role of Anticipation in acquisition, consolidation, retrieval of memory

I was wondering if there is any neurological/neuropsychological difference between the anticipation of an event to come, and the remembrance of that event. More specifically, is there any difference ...
4
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0answers
54 views

What is the relationship between topographic maps and sensory memory?

Sensory maps are defined functionally: they exist for a certain time window, are overwritten quickly, are generally inaccessible to introspective control. Topographic maps are defined biologically: ...
4
votes
0answers
72 views

How long could Henry Molaison keep his memory of the present?

I'm talking about Henry Molaison (HM), the famous memory research patient. I hear that he could converse normally with a researcher until he "got distracted", at which point he no longer remembered ...
4
votes
0answers
209 views

Steady State Topography and Advertising/Preference: Weaknesses? Criticism?

Steady-state topography is a derivation of EEG/ERPs using an evoked potential to an ongoing oscillating stimuli called the steady state visually evoked potential (SSVEP). Variations in the phase ...
4
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0answers
29 views

Are there modern cognitive techniques for dealing with searching for information online?

"Google it" is a common response to questions nowadays, and it indicates that people are more and more reliant on the internet for all kinds of information. Frequently this information is not ...
3
votes
0answers
17 views

Measuring short-term, long-term and sensory memory in adolescents?

I would like to measure the short-term memory, long-term memory and sensory memory of children between 10 and 15. If possible, I would prefer a single test or battery. What tests are used to measure ...
3
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0answers
43 views

Can long-term antidepressant use reduce memory and emotion?

Can long-term (~3-4 years) antidepressant use reduce memory and emotion?
3
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0answers
61 views

What brain regions are activated when a dream is remembered?

Some people remember dreams, others don't. The same person can wake up with dream recall one day and without on other days. I know that the association between REM sleep and dreaming was initially ...
3
votes
0answers
55 views

Is there difference between a memory of a dream and memory of waking experience?

I'm very interested in dreaming and have pretty good dream recall. This makes me able to recall and distinguish hundreds of experience within my memory and label them as "dreams". I'm trying to ...
2
votes
0answers
21 views

Spreading Activation Theory

Two questions, (im trying to get my head around this area of study, my assignment is on neurophysiological differences of t/f memory not theories, but reading up on the topic has had me thinking and I ...
2
votes
0answers
96 views

Is memory biased towards positive or negative memories?

I am trying to understand the relationship between positive/negative memories and the congruence of memory to existing beliefs. These quotes are from Wikipedia, presented in alphabetical order: ...
2
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0answers
73 views

Are partially forgotten memories still in your brain?

I have read articles such as... http://www.wired.com/2009/09/forgottenmemories/ and they say forgotten memories are still stored in your brain. What about partially remembered memories. For ...
2
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0answers
28 views

Is there any treatment for cognitive difficulties of patients with Parkinson's disease?

I've read some articles and science papers about Parkinson's disease and found out that many patients often have cognitive difficulties, if not all of them. For memory difficulty, medications to treat ...
2
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0answers
32 views

What causes varying degrees of recall of text when speaking aloud versus mentally?

Background: When i try to recall some memorised passages from a book, I find that some memories are best recalled when i speak aloud and some when i speak inaudibly in my mind. What causes varying ...
1
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0answers
20 views

What's the purpose of worry [if there is any] and how and why does it affect cognitive skills?

I've read some articles lately about worry and how there are basically two types of worry: one doesn't last long and makes you decide to do something ,solve a problem,act on it the other one last ...
1
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0answers
99 views

Does the self-reference effect extend to improved recall of 2nd-person text vs. 3rd-person text?

The self-reference effect has been widely researched in marketing for its ability to improve how favorably consumers remember a message, but less so for its ability to improve recall and learning of ...
1
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0answers
56 views

Early Alzheimer's and cognitive remediation programs

Early symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) includes the loss of short term memory including prospective memory. On a physical level brain cells are being destroyed and that disrupts the neural ...
1
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0answers
16 views

Any research showing success teaching with smell?

CogSci holds that smell is the sense that has the most strong/immediate capability to trigger memories. It is discussed, in awe. We see anecdotes such as the sudden striking memory of sitting in your ...
1
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0answers
22 views

Is recall for an appropriately color coded string of symbols a good measure of level of synesthesia?

The Wiki page on Grapheme–color synesthesia says: ... one recent study has documented a case of synesthesia in which synesthetic associations could be traced back to colored refrigerator magnets. ...