For questions about the encoding, storage, and retrieval of information in the brain. This tag encompasses research all the way from the molecular level in model organisms to abstract mathematical representations, and includes applied learning paradigms and tasks.

learn more… | top users | synonyms

0
votes
0answers
4 views

How accurate is this explanation of memory?

I'm no cognitive scientist, and this video I'm about to cite is certainly not claiming to be a good cog sci resource, but I have done some studying up on neurology and some of the parts of this guy's ...
0
votes
0answers
4 views

why we forget dreams when we wake up?

What is the explanation for which we forget easily our dreams when we wake up?. It has a biological sense, such as to avoid to confuse reality world experiences with dream world experiences? or there ...
3
votes
1answer
41 views

Information storage capacity of a neural network?

I seem to remember reading about some equation that states the amount of information that can be held by a neural network with n neurons in it arranged in l layers, or something vaguely like that (n ...
1
vote
0answers
22 views

What is a realistic mathematical function to model link decay in a social network?

I'm wondering (as a non-psychologist/cogsci programmer) what would be a good mathematical function to model the decay human relationships, or in other words, how people forget about people they don't ...
3
votes
0answers
8 views

Ebbinghaus like model for retention of details from experience

I've come across the Ebbinghaus Curve (forgetting curve) showing the retention of learned knowledge over time, but I wondered if there was the same kind of model for the retention of details from ...
5
votes
1answer
109 views

Can suggestion change memories?

I came up with this question because of my personal experience. I think it may help you understand my question better, so I will describe it briefly. Piece of metal When I was a kid, I ...
4
votes
0answers
61 views

Why are there ads inside trams which ask me to use the tram?

When I sit in my local tram/bus/any public transport, I notice ads which ask me to use the transport system which I do currently use. Seriously, I'm already using it at that time. Why placing ads for ...
1
vote
1answer
69 views

Way to influence readers subconscious to memorize technical data?

I'm writing a technical book. Is there any studies/books on how can I influence the readers subconscious to help them memorize the technical data easier? Preferably ways that do not involve images, ...
1
vote
2answers
70 views

Cognitive Models of learning Working Memory usage

Recently in deep learning, there's been a surge in learning how to use memories as part of the optimisation process (i.e. LSTM's and Stacks). However, these aren't really analogous to how a cognitive ...
7
votes
2answers
24k views

Why are some people unable to easily memorize the lyrics to a song?

Although I have listened some songs hundred of times I can't sing the lyrics to any of these songs from beginning to end without pauses. However I am able to whistle the whole song without difficulty. ...
9
votes
1answer
611 views

Intentionally making ourselves remember things that never happened

I've been reading an interesting book which makes mostly founded claims. However, there is no reference to any studies in regards to one of the following claims: according to the author, visualizing ...
0
votes
0answers
21 views

What combats Retroactive Interference?

All I've found is one sentence somewhere that said something like "more rehearsal." I've also read that the method of loci makes for "minimal interference," but no elaboration on why exactly nor how ...
2
votes
0answers
21 views

Do dreams improve upon memory and understanding by making the sensory experience MORE LIKE thought? [closed]

It is certainly a great fact/truth that the ability of thought to describe or reconfigure sensory experience is ultimately dependent upon the extent to which thought is similar to sensory experience. ...
2
votes
0answers
26 views

Deja vu and some specifics

Deja vu is the feeling of having been where you are presently at some point in the past (usually pointed to dreams because you often cant remember dreams). What would you call that distant memory you ...
0
votes
0answers
17 views

Could someone watch a movie so many times that they can replicate scenes in accordance with the sountrack?

Let's say someone gets extremely infatuated with Ice Age and decides to watch it over and over and over again, until the scenes are burned into their memory and they can sit back and listen to the ...
0
votes
0answers
12 views

Accuracy of memory traces in humans

When given a task that requires the recollection of an event and the person forgets the event, does the brain give them a trace of how long ago that event was which they forgot to recollect, as well ...
4
votes
0answers
168 views

Human memory - remembering sequences of letters vs numbers

There are 10 digits and 26 letters. In computer science you'd need 4 bits to store a digit value and 5 bits do store a letter value. Does the same apply to human brain? Is a statistical person able ...
0
votes
1answer
37 views

Is something not worth remembering?

Does it affect brain negatively if I remember unimportant things? In other words: Is the capacity of the brain (or just too much chaotic data densed together) sometimes a significant factor for an ...
6
votes
1answer
327 views

What causes an inability to recall a melody, beat, or music?

Background: I have never been able to recall melodies to songs. I can play a song over and over again but the moment it stops, I cannot remember what it sounds like. I am referring to the ...
1
vote
1answer
41 views

Can somebody provide a standard test to measure ones working memory & short term memory [closed]

I suffer from memory problem but find it difficult to undrstand whether it is more belief based or real, need a standard test to confirm.
2
votes
0answers
20 views

What is the role of non-synaptic plasticity in learning and memory?

Is non-synaptic plasticity (e.g. changes in the spike threshold) believed to play a large role in learning and memory? If so, which roles are these effects believed to play?
1
vote
1answer
38 views

What is the best strategy to learn a technical material (IT)? (the exam will be multiple choice questions) [closed]

I need to learn for an IT exam. The topics cover a large number of related subjects covering around 10 books. Since I will never need to recall the entire material at once does it make sense to use ...
11
votes
1answer
2k views

What is the scientific term for unexpected, spontaneous dream recall?

I'm interested if there's a term for spontaneous dream recall. I will try to define the phenomenon I'm talking about. Over 10 years ago, I started to notice that I can spontaneously recall dreams, ...
1
vote
0answers
24 views

Is there a psychological concept about erratic (long term) memorisation?

I'm asking as much to improve my study skills as out of curiosity. Is there any research into when memorisation fails? Specifically, why the same person can sometimes routinely fail to remember ...
0
votes
0answers
34 views

Reciting Reverse Order Alphabet vs Reverse Order Counting

Observation A: It's easy to recite the alphabet. It's hard to recite the alphabet backwards. Observation B: It's easy to recite the number 1 to 26. It's easy to recite the number 1 to 26 backwards. ...
5
votes
1answer
3k views

What is a “delayed match-to-sample task”?

This question talked about how a "delayed match-to-sample task" can be used to measure an animal's working memory. What is a delayed match-to-sample task and how can it be used to measure working ...
6
votes
4answers
300 views

How do memories come up for no apparent reason? Is this evidence that we remember everything?

As I was driving, all of a sudden the name "Holden Caufield" came to my mind. It sounded really familiar. I googled the name and it was the main character in The Catcher in the Rye. The last time I ...
1
vote
1answer
58 views

Re-arrangement of brain's functions

In a neuroscience class, I was told that if some part of brain gets damaged somehow and its early enough, the functionalities of that part of brain are rearranged to another part of the brain. This ...
0
votes
0answers
14 views

Are there any case studies of people who develop PTSD from an imagined occurence?

I know of a person who imagined he saw a road accident where his friend died. These images were so powerful that he believed them completely for nearly 40 years. He has been diagnosed with PTSD ...
9
votes
2answers
506 views

PTSD based on false memories

Memory is not just static snapshots or video on a harddrive, but an active process. As such, it is possible to construct false memories (Brainerd & Reyna, 2005). Some of these false memories can ...
3
votes
2answers
62 views

How does the order of words influence our ability to remember a question once it's asked again?

I'm about to send out surveys that I need for a project and these will be sent out every season - winter, spring, summer, fall - each supposedly having the same questions. It's quite likely some ...
4
votes
1answer
56 views

Which intervention improves the ability to remember names the most?

Is there research about psychological interventions to help the average person remember names? If so, which intervention or interventions have the best evidence base to support them? Are there good ...
4
votes
1answer
92 views

Do dreams repeat/continue? Or is it just a perception that a dream repeated?

During lucid dreaming, we sometimes feel that it is a repetition of (or in someway related to) a previous dream, but when we wake up, we can't recollect the first instance of such a dream. Why is this ...
2
votes
1answer
31 views

Able to type promptly, but doubt validity when spelling it out?

I was unable to frame a search query for my question, hence decided to post it out here. I am normally able to type passwords, numbers and other tiny bits of text very fast. However if I have to ...
1
vote
1answer
82 views

How is information stored in the brain

I believe information in computer is physically stored as a lattice of "boxes". Each box is either magnetized or de-magnetized. The computer reads this to retrieve and consolidate useful information. ...
1
vote
0answers
20 views

The amount of information in a human brain

I have little background in the life sciences. I was told by a more informed person that the human brain can store an infinite amount of information. Doesn't this violate the laws of physics. If the ...
1
vote
0answers
13 views

Best ways to remember dreams [duplicate]

What are the best techniques to recall dreams? I am especially interested in scientific research that would prove their effectiveness
8
votes
3answers
247 views

How to better remember your dreams?

Often times, I wake up with an amazing, yet fleeting glimpse of a dream I had. I would like to recollect those events I had in my dream, and try to adopt ways to better remember those dreams. There ...
4
votes
2answers
116 views

Best ways to improve memory

I've once watched a movie in which CIA agent went into a room just for a few seconds and on the next day he could recall every detail of that room, including what was on the monitors. And I am ...
4
votes
1answer
113 views

Are all conscious experiences stored as memories?

There are people with supermemories, called highly superior autobiographical memory (HSAM), i.e., the detailed recollection of events that occurred in the distant past. Although the recollection of, ...
4
votes
1answer
43 views

In ACT-R difference between declarative and working memory

I'm currently studying PRIMs within the context of ACT-R by reading these two papers. In the papers, there are references to both declarative and working memory modules of ACT-R. What is the ...
2
votes
0answers
35 views

Is speed up of arithmetic calculations as a result of memorisation?

In elementary school, it is typical for a student to learn "times tables" to increase their speed of mental multiplication. What is the mechanism for the increased speed of calculation resulting from ...
3
votes
1answer
53 views

Can memory access be detected via fMRI?

Can the use of memory, in it's various forms (working memory, procedural, semantic), be detected and distinguished from one another via fMRI?
4
votes
1answer
3k views

Why do humans' eyes enter an unfocused gaze when recalling a memory or imagining something?

The question is self-explanatory (I hope). Is this trait unique to humans? Does the direction of the unfocused gaze indicate anything about which physical part of the brain is being utilized? Is ...
3
votes
1answer
129 views

Can dreams be memorised?

Would it be possible to activate the human memory and "access" it by means of encouraging certain hormones, to assist a sleeping body to memorize dreams and later (meaning minutes, days, months or ...
2
votes
0answers
20 views

For comprehension and critical thinking examinations, is recognition sufficient, or is recall more imperative for success?

Recognition is the ability to retrieve information given a set of stimulus, be it a cue, a hint, a reference to a term then asking one to elaborate. Recall is the ability to produce content without ...
3
votes
1answer
40 views

What brain areas are involved in memorizing sections of a song?

Typically when I listen to a song, the song will have different sections (e.g. chorus, verses, etc). As a composer, I have found that many songs use this structure to create a sense of repetition and ...
6
votes
1answer
312 views

Does working memory have a role in creativity?

What role does working memory play in creativity? Creativity in this context being easily measurable creativity, so performance on things like the uses task etc. Divergent thinking is the ability to ...
17
votes
3answers
308 views

Why do dreams lose clarity quickly over time after we awaken?

Right after you wake up from a dream, you seem to be able to remember most if not all of the details. Then, over time, these details fade and often disappear. Is this a form of regression? Why is ...
2
votes
1answer
573 views

Is it better to study multiple subjects simultaneously or focus on one subject intensely at a time?

Since I will soon have a bit of free time, I thought I'd use it to enhance my knowledge pool. I chose four subjects that always interested me (but that are not related) and thought I'd dive in a bit ...