For questions about acquiring new, or modifying existing, knowledge, behaviors, skills, values, or preferences. Learning may involve synthesizing different types of information.

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6
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0answers
177 views

'Model-free' learning in humans

In reinforcement learning, there is a stark distinction between model-based and model-free learning algorithms, where model-free methods don't make use any explicit information about the dynamics of ...
6
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0answers
125 views

Advantage of active learning on classification tasks

I am looking for a specific type of experimental test of active learning. Given some artificial or natural learning task that consists of classifying inputs $x$ from a large input space $X$. There is ...
6
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0answers
158 views

How do cooperative vs. competitive activities impact the learning patterns of an individual?

To what extent does cooperative versus competitive learning influence personality development or even pathological behaviors? If these activities need to be narrowed down to a specific category, I'm ...
5
votes
2answers
138 views

Is the concept of conservation fundamental to understanding fairness and capacity in “love”?

I heard this comment on a radio program about Child parenting by psychologists: "A child will not comprehend an explanation that, a parent loves each sibling equally, as they do not have abstract ...
5
votes
1answer
62 views

How do people estimate smoking's impact on their mortality?

I am working on a project that looks at how information about one's health affects smoking decisions. I have an economic background, and not familiar with the psychology literature. So my questions ...
5
votes
1answer
77 views

Where does instinctual knowledge come from?

From Wikipedia: Instinct or innate behavior is the inherent inclination of a living organism towards a particular complex behavior. The example that I find is the easiest to touch upon is the ...
5
votes
1answer
623 views

How to create a course that will give you synesthesia?

I'm thinking of creating a Memrise course that will include numbers and letters with corresponding colors, personality and sounds with aim of trying to develop some synesthesia in myself and anyone ...
5
votes
1answer
126 views

Can learning styles be changed?

Fleming's model of learning suggests 3 types of learners : Visual: Learns by visually taking screenshots of data or by remembering pictures/scenes etc. Auditory: Learns by hearing; can be by hearing ...
5
votes
2answers
142 views

Why do people get “too old to learn”?

This may be a stereotype, but many of us encounter a lot of people who insist that they can't learn a new technology because they're too old. Some of these people can be brilliant learners in their ...
5
votes
1answer
170 views

Reading vs. watching a lecture: which activity results in higher knowledge retention?

I teach calculus to freshmen and currently spend most of the classroom time lecturing. To make classes more interactive I'd like to shift this phase of "knowledge transfer" outside of classes. Either ...
5
votes
1answer
276 views

What causes fear of failure to lead to lack of effort and actual failure?

Background: I'm having hard time motivating myself to study. In my first year I was a very good student, I had the motivation to study because I wanted to compete, it was first and maybe hardest year. ...
5
votes
1answer
98 views

How to test effectiveness of a children's museum in improving cognitive function?

For those who have never heard of a Children's Museum before, there is a national association in the US with some information. The basic idea stems from Vygotsky-like paradigms of learning through ...
5
votes
1answer
322 views

The effects of online chat on written language skills

With the advent of texting and online social networking. There has been a dictionary of new words and acronyms, based on abbreviations. I have noticed that I will misuse there, they're and their, hear ...
5
votes
1answer
88 views

Does personality imply an inclination to be an expert in one field or average in “all” fields?

The question of whether it is better to be an expert in one domain or average in many is too vague. However, instead, I'd like to focus on the following: Are individuals born to prefer being an ...
5
votes
1answer
84 views

Quantify degree to which non-diagnostic features bias category-present response

I need a measure of the degree to which each of several features biases participants to respond "yes" in a category present / absent task for each of several categories. I have stimuli defined along ...
5
votes
2answers
37 views

What terms describe “schema” at various stages of acceptance?

According to WordNet 3.0, quoted at TheFreeDictionary.com, in psychology, schema means "an internal representation of the world; an organization of concepts and actions that can be revised by new ...
5
votes
1answer
111 views

Need good example of two domains involving different procedural knowledge yet sharing same high-level strategies

Working in the domain of intelligent tutoring systems, I have to prove (or disprove) that explicit teaching of high-level strategies will allow students to use learned strategies across different ...
5
votes
1answer
304 views

Can we increase our higher order thinking (HOT) skills by practicing inductive reasoning?

I previously asked about the conceptual links between higher order thinking and inductive reasoning. This question focuses on the potential for improving higher order thinking through practicing ...
5
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0answers
90 views

Does correcting responses after feedback lead to better learning?

In a typical supervised learning experiment, one might present visual stimuli, e.g. faces, one after another and ask participants to classify each one into one of two categories, e.g. A and B. Usually ...
5
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0answers
86 views

Is abstract knowledge incompatible with literal memorization?

Let me describe 2 interesting cases : Solomon Shereshevsky (Luria, 1968 - the Mind of a Mnemonist) had an almost perfect literal memory. He remembers strings of hundreds of digits for years after ...
5
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0answers
44 views

Is association, conditioning, and symbolic learning the same thing?

Symbols and Communication: At some point in human history, we developed communication. Our brains were able to understand that things stood for something else. For example, the sound we make when we ...
4
votes
2answers
426 views

Do people with ADD or Asperger's Syndrome often show different learning curves than neurotypical individuals?

There's some interesting discussion at this Wrong Planet thread Specifically, I was wondering whether people with ADD or Asperger's Syndrome are more likely to show a logistic pattern in their ...
4
votes
2answers
2k views

What is the optimal length of a training session?

When a practice session is too long, there will presumably be a point where no further significant gains can be made without a break. At what point will this be? Update: This question was originally ...
4
votes
1answer
827 views

Does IQ affect learning speed?

Supposedly, people of higher levels of intelligence do learn faster than people of lower levels of it. But this is an awfully coarse observation, and different people can learn at drastically ...
4
votes
2answers
188 views

What is the scientific basis for long-term negative physiological effects of overstudying?

I am interested in long term negative physiological effects that some students experience following overstudying. What is the scientific basis for overstudying? Is over studying correlated with ...
4
votes
2answers
103 views

Is there a formal definition for the difficulty of learning something?

Sometimes I hear that one subject is harder than another, but never scientifically investigated. For example, in high school, it's commonly thought that mathematics is the hardest subject. But I think ...
4
votes
2answers
87 views

Which of ML classifiers do humans use?

Background: In many situations, people use to classify objects without knowing Machine Learning theory. For example, if small children see an unknown animal in the wild, (s)he tries to classify it as ...
4
votes
2answers
170 views

What is the name of the cognitive bias where an expert overestimates the knowledge of others?

I'm looking for a name of a cognitive bias that describes the following phenomenon: A person has been exposed to some area of expertise from a very early age (think 7-10), and for an extended period ...
4
votes
1answer
63 views

Regarding “a human brain can hold enough information to fill 10 libraries”, can we quantify the memory required for a given task?

It is not the exact phrase, but I have heard variations of this claim. I am wondering whether such claim is supported by a study or experiment. I am also curious if there is a way to sort of vaguely ...
4
votes
2answers
270 views

Does associating a color with numbers improve math learning?

I have heard a number of reports that some mathematical savants associate particular colors with numbers. It got me wondering, if colors are associated with numbers during mathematical teaching, ...
4
votes
1answer
319 views

How much more efficient is interleaving skills when learning?

In an interview with Robert A. Bjork this article suggests interleaving skills is better than focusing exclusively on one skill at a time. How much of a difference does the research indicate that it ...
4
votes
1answer
48 views

Are imprinting and computer literacy connected?

I've recently became aware of the phenomenon of imprinting, in which baby animals start to associate with the first moving object with eyes that they see during a critical period of their infancy. ...
4
votes
2answers
231 views

What brain skill does Nonogram (Picross) games develop?

I've been playing Nonogram Picross a lot lately. I really like it and you can always find a harder challenge but I would hate to waste my time for nothing. What brain skill does Nonogram (Picross) ...
4
votes
1answer
49 views

What are the predominant cognitive effects that influence textual learning and recall?

I am a rulebook writer and editor, and I have been digging into the literature for cognitive effects and heuristics that affect one's ability to learn and remember complicated concepts from text. For ...
4
votes
1answer
190 views

Time pressure and learning

What are the effects of time pressure (salient vs. non-salient) and learning? Salient time pressure is basically when you have a countdown timer in front of you. Non salient time pressure would be ...
4
votes
1answer
114 views

What positive techniques can be used to motivate individuals resistant to common gamification techniques?

A previous question I asked dealt with Gamification techniques to encourage people to perform online workplace training. We are hoping that we can introduce some game techniques to lift the ...
4
votes
3answers
95 views

Free software to run online visual category learning experiment

Is there any open software to support a visualization category learning experiment? It should be open-source, and I can add more functions designed by myself to implement this experiment.
4
votes
1answer
90 views

Is “doing everything in your head” a good proxy for intelligence?

Suppose Bob never takes notes in class and just mentally "gets" a subject. Is this ability of mentally learning a subject without actively recording the information a good proxy for intelligence?
4
votes
1answer
245 views

What happens in your brain when a concept “clicks”?

What happens in your mind when the "lightbulb goes off", or a concept "clicks" for you? Why is there such a threshold for human understanding? Existing searches: I've searched a good amount for it. ...
4
votes
1answer
83 views

Learned dyslexia? adult predicament from childhood teacher´s incompetence?

I have a friend, over 30, who is convinced she cannot really read. Of course; she can read, but she struggles so much with sorting letters into words that she cannot absorb the content. Playing - say ...
4
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0answers
78 views

Solving T-shaped maze (probability learning): differences between rats and humans

From Jonah Lehrer's book "How We Decide", he mentions the experiments with rats and Yale undergraduates. I found the paper that (presumably) matches the experiment of rats. Brunswik, E. (1939). ...
4
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0answers
28 views

Are there modern cognitive techniques for dealing with searching for information online?

"Google it" is a common response to questions nowadays, and it indicates that people are more and more reliant on the internet for all kinds of information. Frequently this information is not ...
3
votes
1answer
178 views

How much time is required to relearn a subject after x years?

I'm searching for research answering or giving any form of insight to this question: How long does it take a person to relearn something (any type of learning) when relearning happens x, x+1, ...
3
votes
2answers
108 views

How to gamify a mentoring activity? [closed]

I am working on an app where we are aiming to develop peer to peer training. How could we gamify the learning process to make it more fun?
3
votes
1answer
669 views

Does intermittent fasting increase intelligence?

A little Background: The protocol I am taking about is 16-20 hours of fasting and a 4-8 hour eating window (e.g. fasting between 6 PM and 10 AM). I have been doing IF (intermittent fasting) for 7 ...
3
votes
1answer
387 views

Are there cognitive benefits to two hand typing versus one finger?

I've been reading an old popular psychology book by russian psychiatrist Vladimir Levi. One of the things that he has his depressed patients try is learn to juggle. He insists that such activity ...
3
votes
2answers
219 views

Why does the the sight of gore causes nausea, vomiting and/or fainting?

Why is it that upon seeing anything the involves gore, e.g.: surgical cutting excessive blood blood and pain causes nausea, vomiting or fainting? And why does watching it repeatedly take away ...
3
votes
2answers
129 views

Why can a user seamlessly switch from one language input to another on the same keyboard?

The question regards the phenomenon where a user can switch context on the same tool seamlessly, and as it seems without thinking. The only practical use of the phenomenon that I know of is the ...
3
votes
2answers
191 views

Is it a good idea to play an instrument while studying? If so, what are the benefits?

We've all heard that listening to classical music and such while studying can be beneficial, but I was wondering about actually playing an instrument? If I were to absentmindedly play my accordion ...
3
votes
1answer
85 views

Is actively trying to create insight inducing conditions effective in generating insights?

Kounios and Beeman (2009) show that many insight solutions come when one is in a relaxed state. Furthermore, positive mood helps with insight solutions. But practically speaking, is it wise to try ...