For questions about acquiring new, or modifying existing, knowledge, behaviors, skills, values, or preferences. Learning may involve synthesizing different types of information.

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1answer
38 views

Is “learning” part of cognitive psychology?

in Wikipedia, Cognitive psychology is the study of mental processes such as "attention, language use, memory, perception, problem solving, creativity and thinking." I wonder if learning is also ...
1
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1answer
85 views

How does the brain learn abstract maths?

I have found quite a bit of information of how, on a neurological level, we learn the most basic forms of maths. We seem to be hardwired from the get go, to deal with manageable quantities, can ...
3
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2answers
650 views

Why does the the sight of gore causes nausea, vomiting and/or fainting?

Why is it that upon seeing anything the involves gore, e.g.: surgical cutting excessive blood blood and pain causes nausea, vomiting or fainting? And why does watching it repeatedly take away ...
1
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1answer
56 views

At what point in our life do we know what is real?

Is "real" or reality defined during childhood, or as adults? Is this caused by age, or an event?
2
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2answers
148 views

Have IQ-type measures been tried for other animals?

despite the obvious difficulties of definition and measurement, and the various controversies surrounding the use of IQ-type scores in human beings, it seems unquestionable that there are significant ...
6
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2answers
225 views

How does syntax highlighting affect the learning of a new programming language?

What impact does syntax highlighting have on students' progress in learning a new programming language? I'm looking for studies along the lines of the following hypothetical experiment, which ...
0
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1answer
135 views

How many calories do we burn when we try to understand mathematical proofs?

While thinking we burn calories. For comparison: "And if it’s the right wood and the right chess grand masters in the middle of a tournament, they are going through 6,000 to 7,000 calories a day ...
6
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3answers
559 views

What causes a person to be curious, inquisitive and explorative?

Why do humans (primates) tend to be curious, inquisitive and explorative? They want to know things that they do not. They explore stuff in an attempt to find something new which makes them ...
6
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2answers
159 views

Is ignoring messages a learned behavior?

As someone that works troubleshooting stuff, I've seen a surprising amount of people that, when confronted with messages, warnings and errors, tend to seek help fast (or early in the process) in the ...
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0answers
39 views

What's the impact of studying learning theory in actual learning?

Are there any studies showing the impacts of learning about learning theory on someone's learning? Moreover, at which point learning about learning first makes an impact on you learning a new subject? ...
2
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1answer
84 views

How did Ebbinghaus decide on his number of words in a series?

Herman Ebbinghaus discovered the forgetting curve, by memorizing series of non-sensical syllables like "zod", "byh", "tef", etc., and than seeing how long it took to forget them. The results are ...
2
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1answer
94 views

At what age do children typically reach adult reading speed?

A kid who just started to read puts a lot of effort in processing sentences. These efforts will decrease as he/she gets older and, at some point (around 12, 15?), will read as fast as an adult. Is ...
2
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0answers
47 views

Things not physically moving very hard to concentrate upon - suggestions? [closed]

Hello dear cogsci users, I am a (fledgling) programmer by profession, one who also squarely fits the description of an ADHD person. The symptoms have been making it tremendously hard for me to ...
4
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1answer
90 views

Learned dyslexia? adult predicament from childhood teacher´s incompetence?

I have a friend, over 30, who is convinced she cannot really read. Of course; she can read, but she struggles so much with sorting letters into words that she cannot absorb the content. Playing - say ...
3
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2answers
147 views

How to gamify a mentoring activity? [closed]

I am working on an app where we are aiming to develop peer to peer training. How could we gamify the learning process to make it more fun?
1
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1answer
38 views

Audio Inculcation and Learning

Suppose I have an audio file of a lecture of a professor explaining something to be learned - a physics concept for example, and I listen to the audio file over and over again, much like how people ...
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0answers
64 views

Optimal learning time per day [closed]

Is there any 'value' for optimal learning time per day? I'm thinking of something like attention span, but more general.
4
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0answers
95 views

Solving T-shaped maze (probability learning): differences between rats and humans

From Jonah Lehrer's book "How We Decide", he mentions the experiments with rats and Yale undergraduates. I found the paper that (presumably) matches the experiment of rats. Brunswik, E. (1939). ...
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0answers
45 views

What evolutionary process(es) are thought to have enabled humans to experience dreams?

As some theories suggest, most, if not all, biological features in organisms exist due to environmental factors that trigger the organism's eventual adaptation to these factors for survival purposes. ...
4
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2answers
90 views

Which of ML classifiers do humans use?

Background: In many situations, people use to classify objects without knowing Machine Learning theory. For example, if small children see an unknown animal in the wild, (s)he tries to classify it as ...
5
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0answers
96 views

Does correcting responses after feedback lead to better learning?

In a typical supervised learning experiment, one might present visual stimuli, e.g. faces, one after another and ask participants to classify each one into one of two categories, e.g. A and B. Usually ...
5
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0answers
96 views

Is abstract knowledge incompatible with literal memorization?

Let me describe 2 interesting cases : Solomon Shereshevsky (Luria, 1968 - the Mind of a Mnemonist) had an almost perfect literal memory. He remembers strings of hundreds of digits for years after ...
2
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0answers
115 views

What are the groundbreaking papers on “Perception Learning” within Cognitive Science?

What are the groundbreaking works/papers/results/theories specific to Perceptual Learning within cognitive science? One paper/theory per answer please, and state why do you find this work is ...
5
votes
1answer
338 views

What causes fear of failure to lead to lack of effort and actual failure?

Background: I'm having hard time motivating myself to study. In my first year I was a very good student, I had the motivation to study because I wanted to compete, it was first and maybe hardest year. ...
6
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0answers
56 views

How do our emotions toward a subject affect our brain activity within similar activities?

I'll bring an example: there are people who love to dance and could do it for hours. Yet, if you'd make them run a long distance they would get tired really soon just because they don't like running ...
5
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1answer
462 views

The effects of online chat on written language skills

With the advent of texting and online social networking. There has been a dictionary of new words and acronyms, based on abbreviations. I have noticed that I will misuse there, they're and their, hear ...
4
votes
1answer
95 views

Is “doing everything in your head” a good proxy for intelligence?

Suppose Bob never takes notes in class and just mentally "gets" a subject. Is this ability of mentally learning a subject without actively recording the information a good proxy for intelligence?
4
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0answers
28 views

Are there modern cognitive techniques for dealing with searching for information online?

"Google it" is a common response to questions nowadays, and it indicates that people are more and more reliant on the internet for all kinds of information. Frequently this information is not ...
7
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1answer
91 views

Does identifying a student's sensory learning style and exploiting it result in significantly better performance?

Do people tend to have one pronounced sense (i.e., there is high variability in how strong the auditory, visual, olfactory etc. perception is among people) and can this sense, once identified, be ...
12
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2answers
400 views

Is “brain training” effective?

We've had quite a few questions about "brain training" on this site (see questions tagged brain-training). And the effectiveness of "brain training" has been touched on in several questions (this ...
6
votes
2answers
647 views

Is consistent dual n-back training likely to improve the performance of analysis (mathematics) students?

Suppose you isolate a class of undergraduate mathematics majors who are about to enroll in a semester of real analysis (rigorous, proof-based calculus) and split them into two groups. Then, you ...
4
votes
1answer
967 views

Does intermittent fasting increase intelligence?

A little Background: The protocol I am taking about is 16-20 hours of fasting and a 4-8 hour eating window (e.g. fasting between 6 PM and 10 AM). I have been doing IF (intermittent fasting) for 7 ...
9
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1answer
115 views

Learning a language by Immersion

Immersion is the process by which children learn their native language, but it can also be used in educational settings. Apparently in some countries, where the official language is not the language ...
12
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1answer
179 views

What does cognitive science say about whether to learn mathematics top-down from research papers?

There is currently a popular question on math.SE on whether it is effective to learn math top-down. By top-down I mean finding a paper that interests you which is obviously way over your head, ...
3
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0answers
174 views

Why do power laws describe learning and skill acquisition so well?

In humans, why do powers laws describe skill acquisition? In particular, $$RT = aP^{-b}+c$$ where $RT$ is reaction time and $P$ is amount of practice. Does the power law generalise to learning in ...
7
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1answer
124 views

Philosophy Meets Neuroscience: The Molyneux's Problem

Consider the Molyneux's problem "If a man born blind can feel the differences between shapes such as spheres and cubes, could he similarly distinguish those objects by sight if given the ability ...
5
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2answers
145 views

Is the concept of conservation fundamental to understanding fairness and capacity in “love”?

I heard this comment on a radio program about Child parenting by psychologists: "A child will not comprehend an explanation that, a parent loves each sibling equally, as they do not have abstract ...
4
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1answer
49 views

Are imprinting and computer literacy connected?

I've recently became aware of the phenomenon of imprinting, in which baby animals start to associate with the first moving object with eyes that they see during a critical period of their infancy. ...
6
votes
1answer
58 views

Are association, conditioning, and symbolic learning the same thing?

Symbols and Communication: At some point in human history, we developed communication. Our brains were able to understand that things stood for something else. For example, the sound we make when we ...
6
votes
1answer
67 views

Could neuroscientific knowledge and techiques be used to optimise peoples' education and learning?

Expanding upon this, I have two ideas behind this question - 1) that current knowledge of the brain and its workings (biochemically, biomechanically, physiologically etc) is in its infancy and that we ...
4
votes
2answers
196 views

What is the name of the cognitive bias where an expert overestimates the knowledge of others?

I'm looking for a name of a cognitive bias that describes the following phenomenon: A person has been exposed to some area of expertise from a very early age (think 7-10), and for an extended period ...
11
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6answers
1k views

Is it possible to think in a second language?

Those who have learned a second language are guaranteed to consciously think of words and their corresponding meaning in your native language or vice versa. This is common with more "complex" ...
5
votes
1answer
90 views

Does personality imply an inclination to be an expert in one field or average in “all” fields?

The question of whether it is better to be an expert in one domain or average in many is too vague. However, instead, I'd like to focus on the following: Are individuals born to prefer being an ...
5
votes
1answer
854 views

How to create a course that will give you synesthesia?

I'm thinking of creating a Memrise course that will include numbers and letters with corresponding colors, personality and sounds with aim of trying to develop some synesthesia in myself and anyone ...
8
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0answers
190 views

Does dream recall interfere with “reverse learning”? (Crick and Mitchison's theory of REM sleep)

I've recently became aware of the idea of "reverse learning" that might happen during REM sleep - the brain's attempt to eliminate pathological attractors that might appear in neural networks. The ...
10
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3answers
195 views

Is there any recent work on modeling how we rapidly acquire new knowledge?

I work with neural network models of human cognition a lot, and one thing that bugs me about them is the timescale: they learn over thousands of trials whereas humans seem to learn after a couple ...
5
votes
1answer
347 views

Can we increase our higher order thinking (HOT) skills by practicing inductive reasoning?

I previously asked about the conceptual links between higher order thinking and inductive reasoning. This question focuses on the potential for improving higher order thinking through practicing ...
3
votes
1answer
203 views

How much time is required to relearn a subject after x years?

I'm searching for research answering or giving any form of insight to this question: How long does it take a person to relearn something (any type of learning) when relearning happens x, x+1, ...
4
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1answer
209 views

Time pressure and learning

What are the effects of time pressure (salient vs. non-salient) and learning? Salient time pressure is basically when you have a countdown timer in front of you. Non salient time pressure would be ...
3
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1answer
85 views

Is actively trying to create insight inducing conditions effective in generating insights?

Kounios and Beeman (2009) show that many insight solutions come when one is in a relaxed state. Furthermore, positive mood helps with insight solutions. But practically speaking, is it wise to try ...