For questions regarding the concepts (e.g., happy, sad, angry) that we use to describe the changes in cognition, behavior, and experience that occur in response to physiological and environmental stimuli.

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3
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1answer
98 views

How to structure affective picture stimuli for an EEG study?

I want to design an EEG paradigm for passive affective picture viewing. Can I use a block design for three different emotions, where each block represent a particular emotion? Or would a better design ...
3
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1answer
61 views

Can time be perceived differently depending on a user's feeling?

You often hear that time passes more quickly when you're having fun. And the opposite is also "true" in common belief, that when you're bored time is very slow. But we know that time is almost linear ...
3
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1answer
35 views

What is the subjective wellbeing instrument that is used by Science of Happiness for check-ins?

I am doing some work with students on happiness and thought it would be useful for us to have a look at their subjective well-being. The EdX Science of Happiness course made use of weekly checkins ...
3
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2answers
477 views

Oddball experiment design in E-prime

I want to set up an experiment in which there are 3 types of emotional stimuli (A, B, C). A and C would have a 1% recurrence probability, for rare and unexpected stimuli. Is there any sample of ...
3
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2answers
53 views

Reconciling one-dimensional valence with distinct mechanisms for reward/punishment

It is a widespread notion in psychology that there are two dimensions to emotion: valence (aversiveness or attractiveness of some entity) and intensity. However, recent experimental studies in ...
3
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2answers
133 views

Why do we anchor our happiness to short term situational comparisons rather than large scale events?

Why does our happiness seem to be most affected by recent, short term happenings rather than the high level trends of our lives? For example, a person has begun their life in a very humble or even ...
3
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1answer
247 views

Are individuals who are generally jealous more likely to experience sexual jealousy?

Some people are just jealous of many things they perceive others to possess. Materially or as part of that person. Is a person who is prone to jealousy more likely to be jealous in romantic ...
3
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2answers
2k views

What is the effect of scolding kids

Is there any harmful effect of scolding kids. Also does that affect more to kids who are 1 year old or to those who are much older like 5 years and so. By the term scolding I mean: Shouting, ...
3
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1answer
200 views

The feeling a person gets when they finish a series

Take for example, a person reading a good book series that they enjoy. While they are reading it, they typically look forward to finishing each volume, as well as the whole series. However, when they ...
3
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3answers
1k views

Is there a term to describe an inability to express emotion or feelings?

I am writing a novel and was wondering if there was a specific term for someone unable to express his own emotions or feelings. The catch here is, this doesn't mean he doesn't know what anger or love ...
3
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1answer
53 views

Do the brains of non-altruistic persons mirror the observed experience of suffering?

Altruistic behavior can have different motivations: from the hope that the help you give will ultimately benefit yourself (social exchange theory) to a selfless wish to alleviate someone's suffering. ...
3
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2answers
146 views

Gaining and maintaining viewer sympathy for an anti-social protagonist

The show "Breaking Bad" is about: A struggling chemistry teacher turns to a life of crime with the aim of providing for his family's future. The protagonist of this show is meant to be ...
3
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1answer
93 views

What causes pathological jealousy?

Taking the meaning of the word pathological to mean maladaptive and unhealthy. What is/are the aetiology of pathological jealousy? What conditions are associated with features of pathological ...
3
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1answer
59 views

Does referring to each other by number in group meetings lead to better results?

I've learned that the pilots of the Red Arrows never refer to each other by name but by number in the briefing room in order to avoid conflict. Is there a name for this trick? Do any studies say this ...
3
votes
1answer
87 views

How does an understanding of the brain explain why people experience strong emotional responses to major sporting events?

Anyone know studies or theories that explain how massive competition events between countries or parties, like the Soccer World Cup Tournament finals or Olympic Games affect our brains? Why do people ...
3
votes
1answer
711 views

Personality traits associated with finishing other people's sentences?

I read in a North American undergrad psychology textbook, that people who tend to finish another's sentences tend to be emotionally intense. I think "emotionally intense" is the wording that they ...
3
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1answer
79 views

Are cortisol measures more reliable than self-reported fear measures for looking at difference scores?

I was sent an email by a researcher with the following question: You wrote that difference scores are okay to use if measurement error is minimised. Does that imply that biological ...
3
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0answers
24 views

Evolution of laughter

In one of his books (cannot recall title now) Konrad Lorentz (ethology study) describes the phenomenon of the appearance of a friendly smile as a spontaneous inversion of a warning grin. He does not ...
3
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0answers
52 views

What is bispectrum?

I am working on a project that uses EEG signals of the brain to identify emotional states. While surveying the literature, I came across several references where "derived features of bispectrum" are ...
3
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0answers
48 views

Can long-term antidepressant use reduce memory and emotion?

Can long-term (~3-4 years) antidepressant use reduce memory and emotion?
3
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0answers
141 views

What causes post-masturbation guilt? [closed]

Is there a study regarding guilt complex associated with masturbation? I am interested to what it can be traced down to. I wonder what actually happens in the brain before, during, and after the ...
3
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0answers
172 views

How has psychology categorised different types of love?

How has psychological theory categorised the different types of love? What taxonomies of love are most accepted or useful in psychology? EDIT: I went through Triangular theory of love. Are there any ...
3
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0answers
19 views

What is the name of text analysis where emotional tone of words is analyzed? [duplicate]

I'm interested in knowing what can be learned about people by analyzing the emotional content of the words they use in casual speech or writing. I've heard it being referred to as " ... analysis". ...
3
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0answers
70 views

What conditions are associated with more intense feelings and stronger reactions to stimuli? [closed]

What conditions are associated with more intense feelings and stronger reactions to stimuli? i.e., where someone may normally feel small amounts of happiness, pleasure, sadness, grief, etc., someone ...
3
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3answers
618 views

Impact of the first love experience [closed]

When we become adults, we think that love is for adults only associating it with sexual relations but I'm sure that all of us have loved or have had some admiration for the daughter of the ...
2
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2answers
245 views

Is there a field of research based around music and emotion in the brain?

I'm looking for research surrounding the scientific study of music and emotion and its effects on the brain. In particular, are there known parts of the brain which activate when playing or listening ...
2
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1answer
60 views

Is there another word for 'affective control'?

In this paper, the authors use the term 'affective control' or the slightly longer form 'affective cognitive control capacity' to mean 'the ability to regulate emotions or manipulate emotional ...
2
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2answers
87 views

What are the side effects of Anger?

Are there any side effects i.e. any hormonal changes , dopamine release when we get anger or while we shout or outburst in anger? Because we feel satisfied getting anger in a situation than keeping ...
2
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3answers
337 views

Can an extravert suffer from social anxiety disorder?

Extraversion is a personality trait that, as the Wikipedia article describes, causes people "to enjoy human interactions", to be sociable, outgoing and love crowds. Social anxiety disorder (SAD), on ...
2
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2answers
274 views

The relationship between working memory and emotion

I stumbled up on this article about working memory. Within a table of indicators of good or poor working memory, it listed the following for adult working memory: Indicators that a working memory ...
2
votes
1answer
73 views

To what extent does the awarness of the presence of others affect brain function and cognitive state?

This scope pertains to non-life threatening interactions and the awareness of the presence of a single or multiple individuals - (not direct conversation, not group mentality) just the presence. To ...
2
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2answers
98 views

Is there a term for enjoying or liking the feeling of guilt

Obviously not sociopathy - or anything like that. I just wondered if there was a term for enjoying the sensations of guilt :) EDIT can you go on - and say something about the differences between ...
2
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1answer
163 views

When we are sad, why do we feel pain in our stomachs?

I thought everything is in the brain. Why do we feel pain in our stomachs when we are sad?
2
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1answer
44 views

How can I understand the phenomenon of mood better?

I have been trying to understand the psychology of liking, for example a particular object(human or non-human). But I am unable to proceed with my experiments(I am just an amateur) because I myself ...
2
votes
1answer
77 views

How to assign numbers to response options on a bipolar scale?

Does it matter which one of the three scales we use: A, B, or C in the attached questionnaire? Each one will have a different interpretation of the data. Please advise how should we analyze the ...
2
votes
2answers
110 views

Terminology for deep-seated feelings?

I'm interested in human emotion. Particularly, we have many words for different emotions, such as love, hate, etc. The issue arises that I have not found words for some of the emotions I've heard my ...
2
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1answer
586 views

Differences between anger and rage

Can rage be considered a subset of anger or possibly a separate neurobiological process. What are the neurobiological, evolutionary and psychological differences between anger and rage? In more ...
2
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1answer
91 views

How to get out of the habit of eating junk food?

What causes habitual eating of junk food? How can one get out of the habit of eating junk food?
2
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1answer
47 views

Can someone not feel i.e. neglect pain sensation?

Ronda Rousey (UFC Women's Bantamweight Champion) once said on a talk show (Conan) that she can take a punch and not feel pain, she added that she knows what pain is and she can just simply neglect ...
2
votes
1answer
176 views

What is the neurological mechanism responsible for losing one's temper?

I'd imagine that losing one's temper is quite normal, I can not think of anyone who has not experienced it. For me, it is rare, but does happen, I find that there can be 3 broad stages occur (note: ...
2
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0answers
28 views

Can emotional IQ be learned?

Can emotional IQ be learned? This question concerns both the general population and those with lower than average emotional quotients such as individuals with Asperger's, or Autism spectrum disorder ...
2
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0answers
24 views

When is Mindfulness Based Cognitive Therapy not useful, or bad?

I'm writing my Bachelor on MBCT, and while there are a ton of studies on the positive effects of mindfulness and MBCT, I'm wondering if there are any cases where MBCT shouldn't be applied. I've found ...
2
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0answers
16 views

Pleasure and reward [closed]

What exactly is pleasure? Is pleasure in some sense 'thoughts'? If you are given opiates, you will feel some sort of pleasure, even if you don't think about anything, but perhaps you are having some ...
2
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0answers
62 views

Why can some people not cry on demand? [closed]

Why is it, when we need to cry, it sometimes doesn't work? Is there any psychology explanation for this?
2
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0answers
30 views

Physiological mapping of frustration

What physiological changes are seen in the brain when a person is experiencing frustration? What effects do these changes have on learning? Optional background: I'm trying to figure out an ...
2
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0answers
22 views

Is there a left or right preference to raising one side of the lip in contempt?

Contempt is expressed asymmetrically - one lip corner is pulled in and back, in what could be described as a half-smile. Are there any trends in terms of people or societies which prefer pulling in ...
2
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0answers
73 views

What happens inside our body, when we experience betrayal and infidelity?

I guess many of us have experienced it. The moment that you understand that "the person you love, in whom you've trusted, is now with someone else, enjoying every moment with him/her". It's so ...
2
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0answers
52 views

Does cognitive & behavioral schools have any analysis for “sympathy” & “compassion”? [closed]

The Cambridge Dictionaries define the word compassion as: a strong feeling of sympathy and sadness for the suffering or bad luck of others and a wish to help them A sample might be when you see ...
2
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2answers
62 views

Can stress be sustained without reflective thought processes

My question is whether the feeling of stress goes away progressively in the absence of reflective thought. Example: you notice someone looking at you and think "maybe I have something on my face". ...
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2answers
271 views

Why do people commit suicide?

I don't understand why people commit suicide. If I imagine myself in a really bad situation and make a list of what kind of things I would do in that situation, I don't have suicide even in my ...