For questions regarding the cognitive processes which result in the selection of a course of action among several alternative scenarios.

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18
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2answers
1k views

What are popular rationalist responses to Tversky & Shafir?

In the early 90s Tversky & Shafir observed several violations of rationality in human participants, in particular violation of the disjunction effect and sure-thing principle. This has lead to ...
8
votes
2answers
606 views

Is Decision-Making Emotionally Based, with Rationalization as the only Conscious Component?

My interest is in how problem-solving decisions are made, and what, if any skills could be taught to increase people's ability to make effective decisions? Effective, in this case, means that an ...
20
votes
2answers
2k views

What tasks does Bayesian decision-making model poorly?

Bayesianism has been a relatively successful paradigm for modeling decision-making. However, not every psychologist is a bayesian, and there are tasks such as the Tversky & Shafir (1992) ...
7
votes
2answers
405 views

Behaviorist interpretations of decision field theory

Decision field theory is usually presented as a dynamic cognitive model of decision making. However, in its basic form, the theory seems to only be concerned with behavior (decisions) and stimuli (...
11
votes
3answers
264 views

Is there a random walk theory that can account for situations with more than two choices?

In the article "Two-stage Dynamic Signal Detection: A Theory of Choice, Decision Time, and Confidence" from 2010 by Pleskac and Busemeyer, a random walk model is presented for situations where a ...
4
votes
1answer
211 views

Why is Mr. Monk unsure?

One of the funniest and most psychologically intriguing characters on TV (in my opinion) is Adrian Monk. If you don't know who he is, I highly recommend watching the TV show. It's called "Monk" (...
4
votes
1answer
122 views

How does the brain know what to crave?

I remember that at some point on House, M.D., one of the characters mentioned that her patient craved milk because it contained some chemical he/she needed. How does the brain figure out what ...
2
votes
2answers
187 views

Why do soldiers seldom “fight to the death” even if they are going to be killed anyway?

At the siege of Masada, a group of heavily outnumbered Jewish soldiers elected to commit suicide en masse, rather than to be captured by the besieging Romans, who would probably have committed them to ...
10
votes
2answers
143 views

Who first used the term 'heuristic' in a cognitive science context?

I seem to recall that Herbert Simon borrowed the term from computer science, but I cannot remember the initial paper in which he made use of this borrowing. A google scholar search reveals some ...
4
votes
1answer
184 views

Are people more likely to pick the odd one out?

I was wondering if there has been any research to suggest that when given a list of options to choose from, people are more likely to pick an option if it looks different to the other options? My ...
0
votes
1answer
53 views

Caller's dilemma [closed]

A close friend, who is going through a mentally rough and disturbed period, just called me, and it made me come up with a question. You call a close friend and someone picks up; but you're not sure ...