For questions regarding the study of the underlying neural substrates of cognition, especially those at the crossroads of psychology and neurobiology

learn more… | top users | synonyms

17
votes
2answers
443 views

Do the neural substrates behind motivation to retain/dispose of property govern whether certain people view their friends and partners as possessions?

I'm trying to understand why people have sometimes have the ability to sever ties with valuable connections, e.g., people that have up until that time meant a lot to them. Colloquially, people use ...
12
votes
1answer
168 views

How does the brain calculate velocity?

How does the human brain calculate velocities? For example, when crossing a road and seeing a car coming towards you, how does the brain actually compute the rough velocity of the vehicle and your own ...
11
votes
1answer
253 views

Does dopamine signal become stronger when goal distance is defined using time?

Howe et al (2013) found that a dopamine signal becomes stronger as a goal is approached. The experiment involved rats running in a maze. If the rats were close to solving the maze, the dopamine signal ...
9
votes
3answers
195 views

Are older people more likely to be politically conservative and why?

J.Campbell suggest that the difference between age groups on being politically conservative is small. But F.Glamsers article concludes: there was a significant positive correlation between age ...
8
votes
1answer
2k views

Are there benefits to learning to write with your non-dominant hand?

There are some articles on the web that recommend learning to write with your non-dominant hand to get in touch with your inner child or a higher power, increase your creativity and be more ...
8
votes
1answer
109 views

What are the cognitive and neurological bases for apathy?

Apathy, or effectively the feeling of "not caring" or putting it colloquially, "not giving a rats", is something that most of us get sometime or another in varying degrees. My question is, what are ...
7
votes
2answers
446 views

Skin conductance responses to emotional stimuli

The skin conductance response (SCR) is said that cannot be reduced to one specific stimulus (Boucsein, 2012). Does this mean that if the participant is presented with stimuli of different emotional ...
7
votes
1answer
113 views

What are the effects of negative self image on cognition and brain function?

All other things considered equal, what are the effects of a negative self image, on cognition and brain function? Are there any studies that would have specific data supporting cognitive outcomes ...
7
votes
1answer
98 views

The effects of pain on cognitive function and incidence of depression

There have been studies about the link between depression and cognitive function.. There have been studies between pain and cognitive function. This has, also, been discussed in this question here. ...
7
votes
2answers
488 views

Are ambidextrous people better at multitasking?

I'm strongly 'one-handed' in that I can barely even write with my left hand. My wife is fairly ambidextrous, in that she's by default left-handed, but can also write with her right hand. I've ...
7
votes
1answer
169 views

What cognitive processes occur during a mental exhaustion or 'burnout'?

Mental burnout - or mental exhaustion is not very pleasant, when one feels completely overwhelmed, something 'snaps' and it is hard to concentrate and maintain motivation. What are the cognitive ...
6
votes
2answers
131 views

Does Andler's (2012) article on 'Mathematics in Cognitive Science' provide an accurate picture of mathematics in cognitive science?

Andler (2012) wrote: What role does mathematics play in cognitive science today, what role should mathematics play in cognitive science tomorrow? The cautious short answers are: to the factual ...
6
votes
1answer
130 views

Intro to EEG - Electroencephalography [duplicate]

Are there any introductory level text, researches or video for "How to learn EEG"? Those material should include dictionary of terms, what waves mean, how to connect some activity in waves to brain ...
6
votes
1answer
61 views

Neural Mechanisms of Accumulation and Triggering

What is the mechanism by which the brain/mind 'accumulates' a felt-sense to a point of 'triggering' an action? For example, if unable to complete a task (e.g. opening packaging), a person can feel ...
6
votes
1answer
65 views

Could neuroscientific knowledge and techiques be used to optimise peoples' education and learning?

Expanding upon this, I have two ideas behind this question - 1) that current knowledge of the brain and its workings (biochemically, biomechanically, physiologically etc) is in its infancy and that we ...
6
votes
1answer
167 views

EEG correlates of handedness

Can any one suggest a good article about features of EEG of left-handed people? I was surprised when find that there are only few old articles about it. I find only one new article by Propper, Ruth ...
6
votes
1answer
152 views

What is the neurological basis of maintaining self discipline?

Self Discipline, as defined in this meagre Wikipedia article as being as the ability to motivate oneself in spite of a negative emotion This is partly distinct from self control and willpower ...
5
votes
3answers
185 views

How do memories come up for no apparent reason? Is this evidence that we remember everything?

As I was driving, all of a sudden the name "Holden Caufield" came to my mind. It sounded really familiar. I googled the name and it was the main character in The Catcher in the Rye. The last time I ...
5
votes
3answers
107 views

Frequency at which electrodermal response should be measured

I'm computer science graduate working on a health monitoring device. How much is the delay in electrodermal response? i.e., the time it takes before which an electrodermal response can be realized. ...
5
votes
2answers
79 views

Can our auditory perception be used to trick our visual perception?

"Our consciousness lags 80 milliseconds behind actual events...The 80-millisecond rule plays all sorts of perceptual tricks on us. As long as a hand-clapper is less than 30 meters away, you hear and ...
5
votes
1answer
115 views

Classic cognitive neuroscience studies that highlight conclusions that could not be drawn from behavioral experiments

Background: I studied psychology prior to going into cognitive neuroscience for my PhD. While I know my own area in depth, I lack the kind of broad overview that people who have done their Masters in ...
5
votes
1answer
43 views

Is there evidence of suppression of the frontal cortex during herding behavior?

Phenomena such as large-scale stock market sell-offs and financial panic in general are often explained in terms of herding behaviors. At how primitive of a level does one actually "follow the ...
5
votes
1answer
113 views

Computational model of biological object recognition

The human brain can achieve a remarkable ability to recognize visual patterns in an Invariant, selective and fast manner. The human visual system is quite powerful. It has an exquisite selectivity ...
5
votes
1answer
82 views

How are hallucinations generated, is it related to dreaming?

I was thinking how powerful auditory and visual hallucinations must be, for the individual experiencing them to be unable to distinguish them from reality. I, personally, have not experienced a ...
5
votes
0answers
73 views

How to set up a binocular rivalry experiment, that splits a single image in two separately controlled ones?

The question is about the actual physical setup and steps needed to take in order to experiment with the phenomena. I found a tutorial on jove.com, "How to Create and Use Binocular Rivalry", and it ...
4
votes
2answers
123 views

What are the neurological mechanisms for a fear of heights when atop a building, but not in a plane?

A fear of heights (or acrophobia), can be debilitating (I know it can be for me). My question is what is the neurological mechanisms that cause a fear of heights in a tall object such as a skyscraper ...
4
votes
1answer
833 views

How does the brain read rotated text?

Suppose a human ran across a letter written at a 45 degree angle. How does the brain read this text? Most people don't often see text written at an angle, so it seems safe to assume that the brain ...
4
votes
1answer
107 views

How does chronic stress improve memory processes?

There seems to be more information on the detrimental effects of stress on memory. There is evidence to the contrary. Stress effects on memory: an update and integration. Schwabe L, et al doi: ...
4
votes
1answer
158 views

What is the consequence for the MBTI in not having a neuroticism factor?

This very interesting question: Do the Jungian Cognitive Functions/ Processes really exist? is dealing with neuroscientific attempts to show Jungian functions and preferences exists. In addition to ...
4
votes
3answers
99 views

What's the neurological basis for “practice makes perfect”?

I was reading Marvin Minsky's The Society of Mind: This (practice makes perfect) is really is quite curious. You might expect, instead, that the more you learned, the slower you would get-from ...
4
votes
2answers
390 views

What is a good textbook for an undergrad Cognitive Neuroscience course?

I am slated to teach an undergrad Cognitive Neuroscience course next year and I am not sure which textbook to use. This would be an entry-level course (no pre-requisites) primarily intended for ...
4
votes
1answer
403 views

What is depersonalization and derealization disorder from a neurological point of view?

Lately, there is a lot of information on the psychological, experiential and behavioral aspects of DP/DR. (I find it most interesting as many have described it as having one foot in the spiritual ...
4
votes
1answer
109 views

Does long-term alcohol use permanently change one's thought processes?

Is long-term alcohol use really capable of permanently changing one's thought processes? In what ways is this possible, and through what physical changes in the brain does this occur?
4
votes
1answer
146 views

“Memory and the Computational Brain” by Gallistel & King

I am looking for opinions on this book particularly whether it is a suitable intro to the field of cognitive neuroscience. What I would not like is a book that is really a collage of introductory ...
4
votes
0answers
36 views

What functions does the brain perform to recognize a familiar object unconsciously?

Let's say a person's brain experiences how a vehicle/object looks for the very 1st time. It would require lot of attention/focus/processing to analyse the object, extract features and train its neural ...
4
votes
0answers
54 views

What would happen if you saw no form of light for a year?

It's proven that low levels of dopamine result in depression, anxiety, etc. And low levels of dopamine just means a lack of production or intake by the dopaminergic receptors. If the lack of happiness ...
4
votes
0answers
77 views

Are we to a point in research that we can correlate measurable phenomena with brain changes?

Given that Long Term Potentiation (LTP) is the process of improving synaptic efficacy. Given that within a lab, the strength and repetition of stimulus on the brain can be linked with the priming of ...
4
votes
0answers
53 views

What is the neurological mechanism behind the “fear of failure”?

Sometimes, the fear of failing at something can be debilitating, and more often than not present a barrier for that person to even try new things - the locus of the fear can be quite different between ...
4
votes
0answers
42 views

What neurological processes occur with 'revulsion'?

As the title asks, what neurological processes occur when we feel revulsion? By revulsion, I mean the involuntary and voluntary physical and psychological responses far stronger than the aversion ...
3
votes
3answers
110 views

Failing to recognise one's own work

Disclaimer: This is not a self help question, I am using myself as an example to illustrate my question. Example: I have posted many questions and answers on this site within a relatively short ...
3
votes
3answers
192 views

How did the unique features of human intelligence evolve?

I have been debating the following topic with a friend. She argues that humans do not descend from chimpanzees or orang-utans, because if we did, such animals would share the same cognitive thinking ...
3
votes
2answers
88 views

Does a person experience release of dopamine while doing something she/he enjoys?

I am wondering if a person would experience an increase in the level of dopamine while doing something she/he enjoys such as playing guitar or reading a book. And what are some other neurotransmitter ...
3
votes
2answers
108 views

Neurosurgically grown neural link between two brains?

I guess it's possible to surgically restore neural connection after a trauma (e.g. a severed hand can be reattached if done quickly). And, from history of evolution of hominids, it seems that just by ...
3
votes
2answers
66 views

Binary classification as a cognitive strategy?

Is there any research investigating whether the human cognitive system has a tendency to reduce complex systems or spectra of data in terms of binary contrast? There are many common-sense dual ...
3
votes
1answer
152 views

How does cognitive science explain distant intentionality and brain function in recipients?

Achterberg and colleagues' (2005) study, Concluded that instructions to a healer to make an intentional connection with a sensory isolated person can be correlated to changes in brain function ...
3
votes
2answers
217 views

What is the maximum size of content the human eye can focus upon?

What is the maximum size of content the human eye can focus upon on a computer screen? Is there a general equation that gives this size as a measure of distance from the screen etc.? What is the ...
3
votes
2answers
149 views

Can ESP and out-of-body phenomena be understood as a form of dreaming or hallucination?

Currently reading about psychedelic experiences, and it is noted in Wikipedia that: Level 4 psychedelic experience Strong hallucinations, i.e. objects morphing into other objects. ...
3
votes
1answer
122 views

Information sampling task

There is a lot of research done on impulsivity trait... Here is detailed wikipedia article: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Impulsivity In adition to that here is one interestiing video of biological ...
3
votes
1answer
74 views

What is the purpose of hemispheric specialisation in the brain?

What is the benefit or purpose of having different hemispheres of the brain contribute more to different cognitive processes?
3
votes
1answer
41 views

Relation between Nengo, SPA and NEF with respect to other Neural Models

I'm working through How to Build a Brain and I keep getting confused on the relation between Nengo, the Semantic Pointer Architecture (SPA) and the Neurological Engineering Framework (NEF). Are there ...