For questions regarding the study of the underlying neural substrates of cognition, especially those at the crossroads of psychology and neurobiology

learn more… | top users | synonyms

17
votes
2answers
462 views

Do the neural substrates behind motivation to retain/dispose of property govern whether certain people view their friends and partners as possessions?

I'm trying to understand why people have sometimes have the ability to sever ties with valuable connections, e.g., people that have up until that time meant a lot to them. Colloquially, people use ...
12
votes
1answer
254 views

How does the brain calculate velocity?

How does the human brain calculate velocities? For example, when crossing a road and seeing a car coming towards you, how does the brain actually compute the rough velocity of the vehicle and your own ...
11
votes
1answer
285 views

Does dopamine signal become stronger when goal distance is defined using time?

Howe et al (2013) found that a dopamine signal becomes stronger as a goal is approached. The experiment involved rats running in a maze. If the rats were close to solving the maze, the dopamine signal ...
10
votes
3answers
260 views

Are older people more likely to be politically conservative and why?

J.Campbell suggest that the difference between age groups on being politically conservative is small. But F.Glamsers article concludes: there was a significant positive correlation between age ...
10
votes
1answer
5k views

Are there benefits to learning to write with your non-dominant hand?

There are some articles on the web that recommend learning to write with your non-dominant hand to get in touch with your inner child or a higher power, increase your creativity and be more ...
10
votes
1answer
93 views

What salient features of a {conditioned stimulus,unconditioned stimulus} pair are represented in the lateral amygdala?

In classical conditioning, a conditioned stimulus (CS, e.g., a tone) is presented just before an unconditioned stimulus (UCS, e.g., a mild toe pinch) in repeated trials, such that the CS will ...
10
votes
1answer
317 views

What is the neurological basis of maintaining self discipline?

Self Discipline, as defined in this meagre Wikipedia article as being as the ability to motivate oneself in spite of a negative emotion This is partly distinct from self control and willpower ...
9
votes
2answers
170 views

How does masking work?

Masking occurs when the delay between the target and the mask is less than a threshhold (say 50 milliseconds). If sensory data passes from lower to higher visual cortices/processing regions as in a ...
9
votes
2answers
172 views

How does this illusion - that I just inadvertently created - work?

As I was working on a basic chess application for Android, I loaded some chess clip art into my imageviews. Then this happened. Look closely at the top two rows. At first I was startled. My ...
8
votes
2answers
164 views

Is there a difference between hearing and decoding the sound?

I presume that deafness is the inability of hearing any sounds. And I presume that it may also be possible to be less able to decode sounds. In other words, an inability to translate or understand the ...
8
votes
2answers
785 views

Skin conductance responses to emotional stimuli

The skin conductance response (SCR) is said that cannot be reduced to one specific stimulus (Boucsein, 2012). Does this mean that if the participant is presented with stimuli of different emotional ...
8
votes
2answers
99 views

Strengthened Inhibitory Connections Between Neurons

I'm reading Bio Inspired Artificial Intelligence which cites this passage about neuron plasticity: "Spike time-dependent plasticity. The percentage of synaptic modification depends on the ...
8
votes
1answer
103 views

Are the physical sensations of an emotion due to neural activity strictly in the brain or also in the body?

Symptoms of anxiety and anger are often described as some sort of energetic sensation in my chest and sometimes face or arms. Are these sensations an 'illusion' from neural activity strictly in the ...
8
votes
1answer
71 views

Neural Mechanisms of Accumulation and Triggering

What is the mechanism by which the brain/mind 'accumulates' a felt-sense to a point of 'triggering' an action? For example, if unable to complete a task (e.g. opening packaging), a person can feel ...
8
votes
1answer
271 views

What cognitive processes occur during a mental exhaustion or 'burnout'?

Mental burnout - or mental exhaustion is not very pleasant, when one feels completely overwhelmed, something 'snaps' and it is hard to concentrate and maintain motivation. What are the cognitive ...
8
votes
1answer
108 views

How is brain processing different for situation-less vs. situated emotional faces?

In traditional emotional face perception paradigms, participants are shown circle cut-outs of emotional faces. All context has been removed. Participants only see the face. However, it's well ...
8
votes
1answer
177 views

Why is it easier to fall asleep in the dark?

I'm curious if there is any neurological mechanism that explains why falling asleep is easier in the dark. I recognize that this isn't true universally -- a phobia of darkness might make it easier to ...
8
votes
1answer
132 views

The effects of pain on cognitive function and incidence of depression

There have been studies about the link between depression and cognitive function.. There have been studies between pain and cognitive function. This has, also, been discussed in this question here. ...
8
votes
1answer
73 views

Why do people love nature?

I wonder why we feel happy and comfortable when seeing the view of trees, green plants and flowers. Why do we admire sea, waves, fishes inside pure water and sun set? why do we love seeing the view of ...
8
votes
1answer
138 views

What are the cognitive and neurological bases for apathy?

Apathy, or effectively the feeling of "not caring" or putting it colloquially, "not giving a rats", is something that most of us get sometime or another in varying degrees. My question is, what are ...
7
votes
2answers
125 views

Is it possible to erase problematic memories?

This question is inspired by a question I answered on Health. Can we erase problematic memories to aid recovery from depression? A depressed person asked how to erase specific unpleasant ...
7
votes
2answers
76 views

Biologically plausible cognitive model of Wisconsin card sorting task

As discussed previously, there are a wide range of models that have been applied to the Wisconsin card sorting task. However, which one is most biologically plausible? That is, uses a realistic model ...
7
votes
2answers
96 views

Could neuroscientific knowledge and techiques be used to optimise peoples' education and learning?

Expanding upon this, I have two ideas behind this question - 1) that current knowledge of the brain and its workings (biochemically, biomechanically, physiologically etc) is in its infancy and that we ...
7
votes
1answer
148 views

What are the effects of negative self image on cognition and brain function?

All other things considered equal, what are the effects of a negative self image, on cognition and brain function? Are there any studies that would have specific data supporting cognitive outcomes ...
7
votes
2answers
361 views

EEG correlates of handedness

Can any one suggest a good article about features of EEG of left-handed people? I was surprised when find that there are only few old articles about it. I find only one new article by Propper, Ruth ...
7
votes
1answer
138 views

How to set up a binocular rivalry experiment which splits a single image in two separately controlled ones?

The question is about the actual physical setup and steps needed to take in order to experiment with the phenomena. I found a tutorial on jove.com, "How to Create and Use Binocular Rivalry", and it ...
7
votes
2answers
785 views

Are ambidextrous people better at multitasking?

I'm strongly 'one-handed' in that I can barely even write with my left hand. My wife is fairly ambidextrous, in that she's by default left-handed, but can also write with her right hand. I've ...
7
votes
0answers
198 views

Is there evidence to suggest that music can trigger release of a particular kind of neurotransmitter?

I've recently listened to a podcast, "The music in your brain", in which Dr. Daniel Levitin suggests that: Soothing music can trigger release of oxytocin Sad music triggers release of prolactin An ...
6
votes
3answers
3k views

Is there scientific evidence on the benefits of binaural beats?

When two coherent sounds with nearly similar frequencies are presented to each ear respectively with stereo headphones, the brain integrates the two signals and produces a sensation of a third sound ...
6
votes
4answers
296 views

How do memories come up for no apparent reason? Is this evidence that we remember everything?

As I was driving, all of a sudden the name "Holden Caufield" came to my mind. It sounded really familiar. I googled the name and it was the main character in The Catcher in the Rye. The last time I ...
6
votes
2answers
154 views

Does Andler's (2012) article on 'Mathematics in Cognitive Science' provide an accurate picture of mathematics in cognitive science?

Andler (2012) wrote: What role does mathematics play in cognitive science today, what role should mathematics play in cognitive science tomorrow? The cautious short answers are: to the factual ...
6
votes
2answers
112 views

Is there a neural network model of Pavlovian Learning?

I am trying to find a computer simulation of Pavlovian learning. i.e. an action such as salivation in response to a stimulus such as a bell ringing. Most neural network models I've seen seem to be ...
6
votes
2answers
179 views

The “Backwards Bike” and implications for how we think

Here's a video of a guy learning to ride a "backwards bike", if you turn the handles left, then the wheel goes right. It took the guy forever to learn to ride a backward bike. He kept remarking that ...
6
votes
2answers
79 views

Do the colour blind have a distinct visual cortex structure?

Studying the structure of the visual cortex, it seems there are many neural structures specifically dedicated to detecting and interpreting colour. For example, parvocellular cells are particularly ...
6
votes
1answer
165 views

Classic cognitive neuroscience studies that highlight conclusions that could not be drawn from behavioral experiments

Background: I studied psychology prior to going into cognitive neuroscience for my PhD. While I know my own area in depth, I lack the kind of broad overview that people who have done their Masters in ...
6
votes
1answer
112 views

What is the neurophysiological mechanism behind double hearing?

A patient with sensorineural hearing loss can have the symptom of hearing "double" in the damaged ear. Not having a time-delayed echo, but hearing as if he (or other people) speak with "two voices" at ...
6
votes
1answer
205 views

What's the difference between repetition suppression and habituation?

Neural repetition suppression seems to be describing behavioral habituation on a neuronal level. What's the difference between these two terms?
6
votes
1answer
185 views

Intro to EEG - Electroencephalography [duplicate]

Are there any introductory level text, researches or video for "How to learn EEG"? Those material should include dictionary of terms, what waves mean, how to connect some activity in waves to brain ...
6
votes
1answer
114 views

What are the neural substrates of retrieval induced forgetting?

Retrieval-induced effects It is well known that practicing retrieval of remembered items increases the probability of correctly recalling that item in future tests: the testing effect. ...
6
votes
2answers
79 views

Can hallucinogens treat depressive states?

Given the serotonin hypothesis of depression, increasing synaptic serotonin level may cause anti-depressive effects. Hallucinogens seems to have such advantages: They improve mood at once, but ...
6
votes
2answers
258 views

How are humans able to read scrambled text/characters (e.g., CAPTCHA)?

So I'm doing a research on developing a new text-based CAPTCHA system. I've devised a scheme where characters in a text are broken/split individually and randomly, making it difficult for OCR machines ...
6
votes
1answer
46 views

Valence conveyed in simple geometric shapes

I've seen neuroscience and facial recognition studies that give evidence for this idea of simple geometric shapes causing emotional responses or quicker recognition of negative affect. Are there ...
6
votes
2answers
217 views

What is the neurobiological basis of the “inner voice” used for thought or reading?

I've recently experienced a number of hypnogogic near sleep states characterized by change in thinking (stage 1-2 sleep). I noticed that if I let go and get absorbed in the state, I can follow it. I ...
6
votes
0answers
137 views

Has there been a neuroscientific explanation of the color phi phenomenon?

The color phi phenomenon is a perceptual illusion in the visual domain which was demonstrated in an experiment by Kolers and von Grunau (1976). The experiment is as follows. A sequence of coloured ...
6
votes
3answers
152 views

How are hallucinations generated, is it related to dreaming?

I was thinking how powerful auditory and visual hallucinations must be, for the individual experiencing them to be unable to distinguish them from reality. I, personally, have not experienced a ...
6
votes
0answers
204 views

What happens neurobiologically when people “think fast”? [closed]

This question is related to this one: How long can a person stay happy, excited and motivated about something new? I found a couple of references to research that links "thinking fast" to mood lift: ...
5
votes
2answers
213 views

Why is it so difficult to use a “true mirror” as a mirror

This Youtube video shows what a "true mirror" is: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZSxCZCy5Wsk In short, when you look into a true mirror you look at yourself (among other things) as you really are, ...
5
votes
3answers
148 views

Frequency at which electrodermal response should be measured

I'm computer science graduate working on a health monitoring device. How much is the delay in electrodermal response? i.e., the time it takes before which an electrodermal response can be realized. ...
5
votes
1answer
105 views

Why do people who stutter have less difficulty singing than speaking?

From what I have read, stutterers tend to have much less trouble singing than speaking. Do we know why this is the case?
5
votes
1answer
860 views

How does the brain read rotated text?

Suppose a human ran across a letter written at a 45 degree angle. How does the brain read this text? Most people don't often see text written at an angle, so it seems safe to assume that the brain ...