For questions regarding the study of the underlying neural substrates of cognition, especially those at the crossroads of psychology and neurobiology

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17
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2answers
451 views

Do the neural substrates behind motivation to retain/dispose of property govern whether certain people view their friends and partners as possessions?

I'm trying to understand why people have sometimes have the ability to sever ties with valuable connections, e.g., people that have up until that time meant a lot to them. Colloquially, people use ...
12
votes
1answer
194 views

How does the brain calculate velocity?

How does the human brain calculate velocities? For example, when crossing a road and seeing a car coming towards you, how does the brain actually compute the rough velocity of the vehicle and your own ...
11
votes
1answer
267 views

Does dopamine signal become stronger when goal distance is defined using time?

Howe et al (2013) found that a dopamine signal becomes stronger as a goal is approached. The experiment involved rats running in a maze. If the rats were close to solving the maze, the dopamine signal ...
10
votes
3answers
219 views

Are older people more likely to be politically conservative and why?

J.Campbell suggest that the difference between age groups on being politically conservative is small. But F.Glamsers article concludes: there was a significant positive correlation between age ...
10
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1answer
4k views

Are there benefits to learning to write with your non-dominant hand?

There are some articles on the web that recommend learning to write with your non-dominant hand to get in touch with your inner child or a higher power, increase your creativity and be more ...
10
votes
1answer
75 views

What salient features of a {conditioned stimulus,unconditioned stimulus} pair are represented in the lateral amygdala?

In classical conditioning, a conditioned stimulus (CS, e.g., a tone) is presented just before an unconditioned stimulus (UCS, e.g., a mild toe pinch) in repeated trials, such that the CS will ...
8
votes
2answers
112 views

How does this illusion - that I just inadvertently created - work?

As I was working on a basic chess application for Android, I loaded some chess clip art into my imageviews. Then this happened. Look closely at the top two rows. At first I was startled. My ...
8
votes
1answer
107 views

The effects of pain on cognitive function and incidence of depression

There have been studies about the link between depression and cognitive function.. There have been studies between pain and cognitive function. This has, also, been discussed in this question here. ...
8
votes
1answer
121 views

What are the cognitive and neurological bases for apathy?

Apathy, or effectively the feeling of "not caring" or putting it colloquially, "not giving a rats", is something that most of us get sometime or another in varying degrees. My question is, what are ...
8
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1answer
203 views

What cognitive processes occur during a mental exhaustion or 'burnout'?

Mental burnout - or mental exhaustion is not very pleasant, when one feels completely overwhelmed, something 'snaps' and it is hard to concentrate and maintain motivation. What are the cognitive ...
7
votes
2answers
576 views

Skin conductance responses to emotional stimuli

The skin conductance response (SCR) is said that cannot be reduced to one specific stimulus (Boucsein, 2012). Does this mean that if the participant is presented with stimuli of different emotional ...
7
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2answers
102 views

How does masking work?

Masking occurs when the delay between the target and the mask is less than a threshhold (say 50 milliseconds). If sensory data passes from lower to higher visual cortices/processing regions as in a ...
7
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1answer
65 views

Neural Mechanisms of Accumulation and Triggering

What is the mechanism by which the brain/mind 'accumulates' a felt-sense to a point of 'triggering' an action? For example, if unable to complete a task (e.g. opening packaging), a person can feel ...
7
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2answers
86 views

What's the difference between repetition suppression and habituation?

Neural repetition suppression seems to be describing behavioral habituation on a neuronal level. What's the difference between these two terms?
7
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2answers
83 views

Could neuroscientific knowledge and techiques be used to optimise peoples' education and learning?

Expanding upon this, I have two ideas behind this question - 1) that current knowledge of the brain and its workings (biochemically, biomechanically, physiologically etc) is in its infancy and that we ...
7
votes
1answer
128 views

What are the effects of negative self image on cognition and brain function?

All other things considered equal, what are the effects of a negative self image, on cognition and brain function? Are there any studies that would have specific data supporting cognitive outcomes ...
7
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2answers
619 views

Are ambidextrous people better at multitasking?

I'm strongly 'one-handed' in that I can barely even write with my left hand. My wife is fairly ambidextrous, in that she's by default left-handed, but can also write with her right hand. I've ...
7
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0answers
98 views

How to set up a binocular rivalry experiment, that splits a single image in two separately controlled ones?

The question is about the actual physical setup and steps needed to take in order to experiment with the phenomena. I found a tutorial on jove.com, "How to Create and Use Binocular Rivalry", and it ...
7
votes
1answer
203 views

What is the neurological basis of maintaining self discipline?

Self Discipline, as defined in this meagre Wikipedia article as being as the ability to motivate oneself in spite of a negative emotion This is partly distinct from self control and willpower ...
6
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2answers
93 views

Is there a difference between hearing and decoding the sound?

I presume that deafness is the inability of hearing any sounds. And I presume that it's also possible to be less able to decode (and translate to a meaningful message) what others speak [happens a lot ...
6
votes
2answers
146 views

Does Andler's (2012) article on 'Mathematics in Cognitive Science' provide an accurate picture of mathematics in cognitive science?

Andler (2012) wrote: What role does mathematics play in cognitive science today, what role should mathematics play in cognitive science tomorrow? The cautious short answers are: to the factual ...
6
votes
1answer
155 views

Intro to EEG - Electroencephalography [duplicate]

Are there any introductory level text, researches or video for "How to learn EEG"? Those material should include dictionary of terms, what waves mean, how to connect some activity in waves to brain ...
6
votes
1answer
225 views

EEG correlates of handedness

Can any one suggest a good article about features of EEG of left-handed people? I was surprised when find that there are only few old articles about it. I find only one new article by Propper, Ruth ...
6
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2answers
151 views

What is the neurobiological basis of the “inner voice” used for thought or reading?

I've recently experienced a number of hypnogogic near sleep states characterized by change in thinking (stage 1-2 sleep). I noticed that if I let go and get absorbed in the state, I can follow it. I ...
6
votes
3answers
122 views

How are hallucinations generated, is it related to dreaming?

I was thinking how powerful auditory and visual hallucinations must be, for the individual experiencing them to be unable to distinguish them from reality. I, personally, have not experienced a ...
5
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3answers
209 views

How do memories come up for no apparent reason? Is this evidence that we remember everything?

As I was driving, all of a sudden the name "Holden Caufield" came to my mind. It sounded really familiar. I googled the name and it was the main character in The Catcher in the Rye. The last time I ...
5
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3answers
126 views

Frequency at which electrodermal response should be measured

I'm computer science graduate working on a health monitoring device. How much is the delay in electrodermal response? i.e., the time it takes before which an electrodermal response can be realized. ...
5
votes
1answer
253 views

Information sampling task

There is a lot of research done on impulsivity trait. Here is detailed wikipedia article and here is one interestiing video of biological and psychosocial causes of impulsivity. In wikipedia article ...
5
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2answers
64 views

Do the colour blind have a distinct visual cortex structure?

Studying the structure of the visual cortex, it seems there are many neural structures specifically dedicated to detecting and interpreting colour. For example, parvocellular cells are particularly ...
5
votes
2answers
101 views

Can our auditory perception be used to trick our visual perception?

"Our consciousness lags 80 milliseconds behind actual events...The 80-millisecond rule plays all sorts of perceptual tricks on us. As long as a hand-clapper is less than 30 meters away, you hear and ...
5
votes
1answer
131 views

Classic cognitive neuroscience studies that highlight conclusions that could not be drawn from behavioral experiments

Background: I studied psychology prior to going into cognitive neuroscience for my PhD. While I know my own area in depth, I lack the kind of broad overview that people who have done their Masters in ...
5
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2answers
57 views

Can hallucinogens treat depressive states?

Given the serotonin hypothesis of depression, increasing synaptic serotonin level may cause anti-depressive effects. Hallucinogens seems to have such advantages: They improve mood at once, but ...
5
votes
3answers
128 views

What's the neurological basis for “practice makes perfect”?

I was reading Marvin Minsky's The Society of Mind: This (practice makes perfect) is really is quite curious. You might expect, instead, that the more you learned, the slower you would get-from ...
5
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1answer
34 views

Biologically plausible cognitive model of Wisconsin card sorting task

As discussed previously, there are a wide range of models that have been applied to the Wisconsin card sorting task. However, which one is most biologically plausible? That is, uses a realistic model ...
5
votes
1answer
44 views

Is there evidence of suppression of the frontal cortex during herding behavior?

Phenomena such as large-scale stock market sell-offs and financial panic in general are often explained in terms of herding behaviors. At how primitive of a level does one actually "follow the ...
5
votes
1answer
161 views

Computational model of biological object recognition

The human brain can achieve a remarkable ability to recognize visual patterns in an Invariant, selective and fast manner. The human visual system is quite powerful. It has an exquisite selectivity ...
5
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0answers
56 views

What cognitively interesting event-related potentials at FP1, FP2, TP9 or TP10 can be measured with consumer-grade EEG hardware?

I'm looking for cognitively interesting event-related potentials at places like FP1, FP2, TP9 or TP10 that can be measured with consumer-grade EEG hardware. Right now I have an Interaxon Muse EEG and ...
5
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0answers
87 views

Has there been a neuroscientific explanation of the color phi phenomenon?

The color phi phenomenon is a perceptual illusion in the visual domain which was demonstrated in an experiment by Kolers and von Grunau (1976). The experiment is as follows. A sequence of coloured ...
5
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0answers
53 views

What functions does the brain perform to recognize a familiar object unconsciously?

Let's say a person's brain experiences how a vehicle/object looks for the very 1st time. It would require lot of attention/focus/processing to analyse the object, extract features and train its neural ...
5
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0answers
180 views

What happens neurobiologically when people “think fast”?

This question is related to this one: How long can a person stay happy, excited and motivated about something new? I found a couple of references to research that links "thinking fast" to mood lift: ...
5
votes
1answer
152 views

Is there evidence to suggest that music can trigger release of a particular kind of neurotransmitter?

I've recently listened to a podcast, "The music in your brain", in which Dr. Daniel Levitin suggests that: Soothing music can trigger release of oxytocin Sad music triggers release of prolactin An ...
4
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2answers
90 views

Why is it so difficult to use a “true mirror” as a mirror

This Youtube video shows what a "true mirror" is: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZSxCZCy5Wsk In short, when you look into a true mirror you look at yourself (among other things) as you really are, ...
4
votes
2answers
163 views

What are the neurological mechanisms for a fear of heights when atop a building, but not in a plane?

A fear of heights (or acrophobia), can be debilitating (I know it can be for me). My question is what is the neurological mechanisms that cause a fear of heights in a tall object such as a skyscraper ...
4
votes
1answer
841 views

How does the brain read rotated text?

Suppose a human ran across a letter written at a 45 degree angle. How does the brain read this text? Most people don't often see text written at an angle, so it seems safe to assume that the brain ...
4
votes
1answer
69 views

Difference in frequencies of mistakes between use of left-right vs. up-down

I have no hard data, but from my personal experience in people specifying right or left directions (similarly east or west) and up or down (north or south, top or bottom), people frequently make ...
4
votes
1answer
113 views

How does chronic stress improve memory processes?

There seems to be more information on the detrimental effects of stress on memory. There is evidence to the contrary. Stress effects on memory: an update and integration. Schwabe L, et al doi: ...
4
votes
1answer
206 views

What is the consequence for the MBTI in not having a neuroticism factor?

This very interesting question: Do the Jungian Cognitive Functions/ Processes really exist? is dealing with neuroscientific attempts to show Jungian functions and preferences exists. In addition to ...
4
votes
2answers
576 views

What is a good textbook for an undergrad Cognitive Neuroscience course?

I am slated to teach an undergrad Cognitive Neuroscience course next year and I am not sure which textbook to use. This would be an entry-level course (no pre-requisites) primarily intended for ...
4
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1answer
70 views

What are the neural substrates of retrieval induced forgetting?

Retrieval-induced effects It is well known that practicing retrieval of remembered items increases the probability of correctly recalling that item in future tests: the testing effect. ...
4
votes
1answer
1k views

What is depersonalization and derealization disorder from a neurological point of view?

Lately, there is a lot of information on the psychological, experiential and behavioral aspects of DP/DR. (I find it most interesting as many have described it as having one foot in the spiritual ...