For questions regarding the study of the underlying neural substrates of cognition, especially those at the crossroads of psychology and neurobiology

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2answers
314 views

Neural Microfilaments for Computation?

I just watched an interesting TED talk (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1d5RetvkkuQ) where a Stuart Hameroff proposes that a neuron's microtubules are responsible for computations, and that they are ...
5
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3answers
2k views

Is there scientific evidence on the benefits of binaural beats?

When two coherent sounds with nearly similar frequencies are presented to each ear respectively with stereo headphones, the brain integrates the two signals and produces a sensation of a third sound ...
6
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1answer
104 views

What are the neural substrates of retrieval induced forgetting?

Retrieval-induced effects It is well known that practicing retrieval of remembered items increases the probability of correctly recalling that item in future tests: the testing effect. ...
5
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0answers
188 views

Is there evidence to suggest that music can trigger release of a particular kind of neurotransmitter?

I've recently listened to a podcast, "The music in your brain", in which Dr. Daniel Levitin suggests that: Soothing music can trigger release of oxytocin Sad music triggers release of prolactin An ...
6
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4answers
287 views

How do memories come up for no apparent reason? Is this evidence that we remember everything?

As I was driving, all of a sudden the name "Holden Caufield" came to my mind. It sounded really familiar. I googled the name and it was the main character in The Catcher in the Rye. The last time I ...
3
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1answer
283 views

Neuroplasticity and Treatment of Depression

After reading 'The Brain That Changes Itself' by Norman Doidge, 'The Mind and The Brain' by Jeffrey Schwartz and a few other books, I've become curious about the science of neuroplasticity, which, as ...
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8answers
5k views

What's the major difference between mind and brain?

I am preparing a presentation on "Mind Reading Computer", and all articles that I came across were focused on reading interpretations from brain through sensors. Articles like this clearly show a ...
6
votes
2answers
166 views

The “Backwards Bike” and implications for how we think

Here's a video of a guy learning to ride a "backwards bike", if you turn the handles left, then the wheel goes right. It took the guy forever to learn to ride a backward bike. He kept remarking that ...
6
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2answers
205 views

What is the neurobiological basis of the “inner voice” used for thought or reading?

I've recently experienced a number of hypnogogic near sleep states characterized by change in thinking (stage 1-2 sleep). I noticed that if I let go and get absorbed in the state, I can follow it. I ...
10
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1answer
5k views

Are there benefits to learning to write with your non-dominant hand?

There are some articles on the web that recommend learning to write with your non-dominant hand to get in touch with your inner child or a higher power, increase your creativity and be more ...
7
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2answers
94 views

Could neuroscientific knowledge and techiques be used to optimise peoples' education and learning?

Expanding upon this, I have two ideas behind this question - 1) that current knowledge of the brain and its workings (biochemically, biomechanically, physiologically etc) is in its infancy and that we ...
3
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1answer
330 views

Is it possible to detect the mental flow state with EEG?

I know that it is possible to detect "focus" with a consumer EEG with a single electrode and a reference point (ear clip), even without conductive gel, but is it possible to detect a flow state with ...
4
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1answer
289 views

What is the consequence for the MBTI in not having a neuroticism factor?

This very interesting question: Do the Jungian Cognitive Functions/ Processes really exist? is dealing with neuroscientific attempts to show Jungian functions and preferences exists. In addition to ...
3
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1answer
235 views

How far can we train mental calculation?

Mental calculators are people with a prodigious ability in some area of mental calculation, such as multiplying large numbers or factoring large numbers. Unfortunately I forgot where I heard it, ...
2
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0answers
95 views

Are partially forgotten memories still in your brain?

I have read articles such as... http://www.wired.com/2009/09/forgottenmemories/ and they say forgotten memories are still stored in your brain. What about partially remembered memories. For ...
8
votes
1answer
127 views

The effects of pain on cognitive function and incidence of depression

There have been studies about the link between depression and cognitive function.. There have been studies between pain and cognitive function. This has, also, been discussed in this question here. ...
7
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2answers
335 views

EEG correlates of handedness

Can any one suggest a good article about features of EEG of left-handed people? I was surprised when find that there are only few old articles about it. I find only one new article by Propper, Ruth ...
5
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0answers
28 views

Is it sufficient to say self control eliciting the reduced ERN (error-related negativity) in cognitive control tasks?

The limited resource model of self control suggests that the exertion of self control can impair performance in subsequent cognitive control tasks (for details on the model, check this question. Most ...
4
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1answer
80 views

What physical process governs which details are retained in memory?

With long term memory, there is loss of information. For example, we don't seem to retain all the details of every image we see. What is the physical process those details undergo which cause them to ...
3
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1answer
93 views

What is the purpose of hemispheric specialisation in the brain?

What is the benefit or purpose of having different hemispheres of the brain contribute more to different cognitive processes?
3
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0answers
150 views

Spontaneous change of handedness

I read this question Are there benefits to learning to write with your non-dominant hand?. It got me thinking. Disclaimer: This is not a self help question I am using myself to illustrate the ...
2
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2answers
421 views

What is the difference between “double dissociation” and simply having control and experimental groups?

According to my textbook Cognitive Psychology by E. Bruce Goldstein, a double dissociation occurs if damage to one area of the brain causes a function A to be absent while function B is present, ...
2
votes
1answer
104 views

Effective sampling rate in human visual system

The [stroboscopic effect][1] is often explained as one of the problems of sampling. If sample rate is too low, you might have the impression of the signal frequency being low or even reverse. There ...
2
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1answer
4k views

What does double dissociation really tell us?

In psychological research, a single dissociation is when a manipulation leaves one cognitive function (say, A) intact whilst severing another (say, B). This indicates the functions A and B are at ...
2
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1answer
902 views

What are the cognitive effects of increasing testosterone levels in men?

I've recently became interested in the effects if testosterone on the cognitive function in men, but cannot find much hard scientific evidence on the subject. What are the cognitive effects of ...
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2answers
2k views

Inducing long term low latent inhibition [closed]

From what I have gathered of low latent inhibition, it is an extreme increased level of dopamine in the brain.. dopamine is a neurotransmitter and hormone. Increasing it has many advantages and a ...