For questions regarding the study of the underlying neural substrates of cognition, especially those at the crossroads of psychology and neurobiology

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844 views

How does the brain read rotated text?

Suppose a human ran across a letter written at a 45 degree angle. How does the brain read this text? Most people don't often see text written at an angle, so it seems safe to assume that the brain ...
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1answer
61 views

What's the difference between executive functions and cognitive control?

I suspect that the difference between these terms may vary from researcher to researcher, since the wikipedia page treats them as synonymous. What's the difference between executive functioning and ...
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1answer
222 views

What is the consequence for the MBTI in not having a neuroticism factor?

This very interesting question: Do the Jungian Cognitive Functions/ Processes really exist? is dealing with neuroscientific attempts to show Jungian functions and preferences exists. In addition to ...
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1answer
117 views

How does chronic stress improve memory processes?

There seems to be more information on the detrimental effects of stress on memory. There is evidence to the contrary. Stress effects on memory: an update and integration. Schwabe L, et al doi: ...
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1answer
86 views

What are the neural substrates of retrieval induced forgetting?

Retrieval-induced effects It is well known that practicing retrieval of remembered items increases the probability of correctly recalling that item in future tests: the testing effect. ...
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1answer
38 views

Are there any studies (fMRI scans, etc) showing why some people (supposedly) are more open to hypnotism?

In this article published in Harper's magazine back in 1996, journalist David Foster Wallace described his experience with hypnotist Nigel Ellery (see the last section of the article, titled "THE ...
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31 views

What are there neuroanatomical mappings of the Wisconsin Card Sorting Task?

I know that the Wisconsin Card Sorting Task is used to diagnose various mental disfunctions such as schizophrenia and drug addiction. However, has it been specified what brain regions or structures ...
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1answer
117 views

Why do con artists like Frank Abagnale Jr. not feel guilt?

I just finished watching a video of Frank Abagnale Jr discuss his life history. Who knows if its true, but it is an amazing story. For those who don't know, Frank Abagnale is one of the most infamous ...
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2answers
604 views

What is a good textbook for an undergrad Cognitive Neuroscience course?

I am slated to teach an undergrad Cognitive Neuroscience course next year and I am not sure which textbook to use. This would be an entry-level course (no pre-requisites) primarily intended for ...
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38 views

Does knowledge of tests like Iowa Gambling and Wisconsin Card-Sorting task enable a person to fake the test?

I am interested in tests like the Iowa gambling test and the Wisconsin card-sorting test. If a patient understands how such a test works and the goals of the test, does this bias the measure obtained? ...
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90 views

What are the underlying mechanisms for optimism bias?

I have asked a question before about how does smoker's decision react to new personal health information. Link here. How do people estimate smoking's impact on their mortality? Now I have a ...
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3answers
128 views

What brain wave states are associated with hypnosis?

What brain wave states are most correlated with deep hypnosis?
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140 views

Does long-term alcohol use permanently change one's thought processes?

Is long-term alcohol use really capable of permanently changing one's thought processes? In what ways is this possible, and through what physical changes in the brain does this occur?
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Does the brain need more sleep after heavy load?

Does the brain require more sleep in the following night, if you have used a lot more of its capacity that day than usually?
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185 views

“Memory and the Computational Brain” by Gallistel & King

I am looking for opinions on this book particularly whether it is a suitable intro to the field of cognitive neuroscience. What I would not like is a book that is really a collage of introductory ...
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21 views

Continuous Basic EEG analysis [closed]

So, I have continuous EEG data from a control group and a test group. The recording was done while the participants were at rest, so no task was performed. I want to start with some basic analysis, ...
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23 views

Is it sufficient to say self control eliciting the reduced ERN (error-related negativity) in cognitive control tasks?

The limited resource model of self control suggests that the exertion of self control can impair performance in subsequent cognitive control tasks (for details on the model, check this question. Most ...
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31 views

Is the mind's adaptation to increased traveling speeds, physical or psychological?

When a motor vehicle increases in speed, we soon adjust to the faster pace of movement; seemingly by processing incoming information faster. Is this purely psychological, with the brain "dropping" ...
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41 views

Cognitive (neuro)science and related mailing lists

I am looking for cognitive neuroscience (and related) mailing lists. For some time I have been subscribed to Visionlist and found it to be a tremendous source of information about conferences, PhD and ...
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52 views

What is a good general reference on cognitive science in military training?

I know that one of the application of cognitive science is military science. Unfortunately I haven't found a good source on how cognitive science could benefit military training. Is there any ...
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65 views

What would happen if you saw no form of light for a year?

It's proven that low levels of dopamine result in depression, anxiety, etc. And low levels of dopamine just means a lack of production or intake by the dopaminergic receptors. If the lack of happiness ...
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54 views

What is the relationship between topographic maps and sensory memory?

Sensory maps are defined functionally: they exist for a certain time window, are overwritten quickly, are generally inaccessible to introspective control. Topographic maps are defined biologically: ...
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42 views

Can split-brain patients sleep like whales?

Regular split-brain patients still have some remaining connection between the hemispheres, but would it be possible for their hemispheres to fall asleep independent of the other? What about when not ...
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73 views

How do auditory and visual hallucinations differ within the brain?

I asked this question How are hallucinations generated, is it related to dreaming?. It occurs to me that auditory hallucinations may well be generated in a different part of the brain to visual ...
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80 views

Are we to a point in research that we can correlate measurable phenomena with brain changes?

Given that Long Term Potentiation (LTP) is the process of improving synaptic efficacy. Given that within a lab, the strength and repetition of stimulus on the brain can be linked with the priming of ...
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61 views

What is the neurological mechanism behind the “fear of failure”?

Sometimes, the fear of failing at something can be debilitating, and more often than not present a barrier for that person to even try new things - the locus of the fear can be quite different between ...
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52 views

What neurological processes occur with 'revulsion'?

As the title asks, what neurological processes occur when we feel revulsion? By revulsion, I mean the involuntary and voluntary physical and psychological responses far stronger than the aversion ...
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53 views

How do humans perceive height or vertical drop?

I'm looking at this video: Neil Burgess: How your brain tells you where you are, which discusses neurons within the brain that help people remember where stuff is in relation to other objects. I'm ...
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128 views

Universal Mind? Nature or Nurture? [closed]

I have been reading a book entitled "The Geography of Thought" by Richard Nisbett. He talks about how easterners and westerners think differently. I am not all the way through it, but I agree with a ...
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2answers
171 views

Is there scientific evidence on the benefits of binaural beats?

When two coherent sounds with nearly similar frequencies are presented to each ear respectively with stereo headphones, the brain integrates the two signals and produces a sensation of a third sound ...
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3answers
111 views

Failing to recognise one's own work

Disclaimer: This is not a self help question, I am using myself as an example to illustrate my question. Example: I have posted many questions and answers on this site within a relatively short ...
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3answers
235 views

How did the unique features of human intelligence evolve?

I have been debating the following topic with a friend. She argues that humans do not descend from chimpanzees or orang-utans, because if we did, such animals would share the same cognitive thinking ...
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2answers
120 views

Neurosurgically grown neural link between two brains?

I guess it's possible to surgically restore neural connection after a trauma (e.g. a severed hand can be reattached if done quickly). And, from history of evolution of hominids, it seems that just by ...
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2answers
106 views

Does a person experience release of dopamine while doing something she/he enjoys?

I am wondering if a person would experience an increase in the level of dopamine while doing something she/he enjoys such as playing guitar or reading a book. And what are some other neurotransmitter ...
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2answers
59 views

Are there mental reflexes?

Similar to knee-jerk or withdrawal, are there any innate reflexes in cognition? Are they based on personality, or are there any that are universal?
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84 views

Binary classification as a cognitive strategy?

Is there any research investigating whether the human cognitive system has a tendency to reduce complex systems or spectra of data in terms of binary contrast? There are many common-sense dual ...
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400 views

What is the maximum size of content the human eye can focus upon?

What is the maximum size of content the human eye can focus upon on a computer screen? Is there a general equation that gives this size as a measure of distance from the screen etc.? What is the ...
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2answers
184 views

Can ESP and out-of-body phenomena be understood as a form of dreaming or hallucination?

Currently reading about psychedelic experiences, and it is noted in Wikipedia that: Level 4 psychedelic experience Strong hallucinations, i.e. objects morphing into other objects. ...
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4answers
116 views

Different neural structures for quick vs. methodical decision making

In the book "Thinking, Fast and Slow", the author claims that there are two systems of thinking. System 1 is quick, instinctive and emotionally driven while System 2 is more logical and deliberate. ...
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1answer
239 views

Neuroplasticity and Treatment of Depression

After reading 'The Brain That Changes Itself' by Norman Doidge, 'The Mind and The Brain' by Jeffrey Schwartz and a few other books, I've become curious about the science of neuroplasticity, which, as ...
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1answer
79 views

What is the purpose of hemispheric specialisation in the brain?

What is the benefit or purpose of having different hemispheres of the brain contribute more to different cognitive processes?
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1answer
61 views

Relation between Nengo, SPA and NEF with respect to other Neural Models

I'm working through How to Build a Brain and I keep getting confused on the relation between Nengo, the Semantic Pointer Architecture (SPA) and the Neurological Engineering Framework (NEF). Are there ...
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1answer
105 views

How does the brain know whether or not it comprehends a novel concept?

There seem to be at least two kinds of confusion regarding novel concepts. In one, the brain simply can't form an abstract model from whatever information is being presented. It's where you can't ...
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103 views

Do different methods of testing memory for character sequences result in different brain activation?

Assume a certain sequence of N characters, displayed on a screen one by one, that should be memorized. The speed of the display is such that it doesn't produce much extra stress. You may assume that ...
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1answer
51 views

What are “linear spatial weightings” and “specific temporal windows” in Philiastides & Sajda (2006)?

I am undergraduate student in mathematics and a complete beginner in the field of neuroscience. I recently started a project in Mathematical biology which brought me to the above mentioned paper. I ...
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1answer
254 views

What are the neurological and psychological bases for chromophobia

According to this amusing, yet informative Cracked article, Phobia-source article and Chromophobia: do you have a fear of colours website, chromophoba is a fear of bright colours. This condition is ...
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2answers
133 views

Why neural architecture is not hardwired for N-dimensional vision but hardwired for abstract math?

In The Theoretical Minimum, in lecture 1, Leonard Susskind says that you can only visualize 3 dimentional images. (see yourself). Therefore, he says, in order to deal with N dimensions, you need to ...
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190 views

How does the brain physically get tired?

When engaging in physical work-outs, people often research how regular muscles store energy, how to eat and exercise cleverly so that the exercises actually make them stronger and more healthy instead ...
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1answer
46 views

How does Parkinson's disease result in tremors?

From what I understand, Parkinson's disease is caused by the death of dopamine producing cells in the substantia nigra, however I don't understand how that causses the symptoms of Parkinson's. I am ...
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1answer
84 views

Dichotic listening tasks and crosstalk

In a dichotic listening task where participants listen to different (frequency-wise) musical tones through headphones, is cross talk to the contralateral cochlea of each ear through bone conduction a ...