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From my past I have seen some people who like to compete in games and try to be first(by games I mean all kind of games or hobbies such as video-games, sports etc. in which competition is included). I assume this kind of activity is needed when people have the need to know that they are equal with the others or to stay above average and be satisfied for what they can achieved.

What is your research is there about this and what actually triggers some people to compete more than others. Is it a nature or a nurture thing?


This obviously has to do with psychological matters which can't be analyzed to a detail and is some kind of a philosophical question but even though which is your opinion also links and studies on this matter will be greatly appreciated.

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Phil, what exactly is your question? –  user3543 Dec 5 '13 at 10:02
    
I admit my question is a little blurry nevertheless I want to say what is the thing or emotion and how it is nurtured in order to make someone competitive. –  Phil_Charly Dec 5 '13 at 10:06
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Want to add it to your question :) Interesting btw +1 –  user3543 Dec 5 '13 at 10:07
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Thanks very much for all,I find this forum interesting and fascinating I personally love cognitive science and thanks again for the support :) –  Phil_Charly Dec 5 '13 at 14:44
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I think its just an urge to delay a pain that was bottled in the past. Saving the day.(for computer games). Being failed in real life makes one try to be best in game. Such as cheating or even using bugs of game. If the player is just gifted, winning is inevitable even without cheating ^^ . We fall, to rise again. –  huseyin tugrul buyukisik Dec 11 '13 at 13:29

1 Answer 1

Culture, psychology and physiology (gender) all play an important role is determining ones willingness and ability to compete.

In one sense your nationality influences your desire to compete. Competition and conflict does not originate with Americans but we have fostered via our culture a society of those who compete. Human nature outside of modern social forces was largely communal and cooperative based.

Psychologically speaking on an individual basis what techniques you know to handle competition will help you perform under the stress of competition but will not itself cause you to be a better performer. It seems the challenge or resistance causes development; not competition.

Testosterone and the male gender roles make competition easier for men. Men are less anxious to start competition. Being easier to start will cause more men to engage in competitive behavior than woman. (Even though women are equally competitive once they begin). Men also outperform women on higher competitive test like college entrance exams where as women outperform men on high school exit exams.

(a) attitudes toward competition (although men may feel comfortable performing in a competitive setting, women may be more anxious about such prospects), (b) beliefs about relative performance (men may be more confident that they are among the highest-performing participants and thus be more inclined to compete), and (c) risk and feedback aversion (the tournament is not only competitive but is also more uncertain and provides more information about relative performance than the piece-rate scheme; if women are more averse to such factors, they may be less inclined to select competitive compensation).

-Gender and Competition: Why do woman shy away from competition.

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