Take the 2-minute tour ×
Cognitive Sciences Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for practitioners, researchers, and students in cognitive science, psychology, neuroscience, and psychiatry. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I read in a North American undergrad psychology textbook, that people who tend to finish another's sentences tend to be emotionally intense. I think "emotionally intense" is the wording that they used. The impression that was given is that the type of person tends to swing moods more often or to a larger degree; they're more emotional.

Can someone cite the study? And does anyone know any other traits of people who like to finish another's thoughts?

share|improve this question
    
I doubt that any one could finish another's thoughts. Unless you hold that thoughts are synonymous with sentences, which I don't as there are no thoughts, only sentences. –  Dan D. Nov 23 '13 at 6:11
    
@Dan D., I understand your argument and I considered this when I used the term "thoughts" to replace "sentences". I erred towards using the more general term "thought" in case there were cases that I did not consider, like nonverbal communication. If you have a better term to cover such things, please suggest it. Maybe messages? Expressions? –  NiteCyper Nov 23 '13 at 7:40

1 Answer 1

Several factors may influence a person to finish off other peopla's sentences. - The person may be stressed (and some people stress more often than others, thus stress may cause some people to do this more often) - ADHD is said to cause an impatience, making the clients finish off other people's sentences: http://www.healthline.com/health/adult-adhd - A person may have a lot of energy, spending a bit of this energy on finishing off other's sentences. - The speaker and the listener might ble close to eachother, and know eachother very well, maybe the listener was "just thinking of just the same thing"..

Whether or not I can find sources on "emotionally intense" people doing this, depends on how one defines being "emotionally intense". You could probably call any of the above examples emotionally intense people...

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.