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I quote from the publication "After-birth abortion: why should the baby live?" (Giubilini & Minerva, 2013):

We take ‘person’ to mean an individual who is capable of attributing to her own existence some (at least) basic value such that being deprived of this existence represents a loss to her.

My first question is this: Given that studies show bonds between newborns and mothers. A newborn is capable of communicating emotion and needs.
What evidence is there that demonstrates a newborn is incapable of attributing to her own existence some (at least) basic value?

I would, also, like to point out the logic in the second part of this premise:
Given that death, the cessation of life as we can observe it, means the cessation of consciousness. So it follows that the deprivation of such existence cannot represent a loss to that individual.

Is this second part of the statement a scientifically provable fact?

I have provided some of the context of this quote in the excerpt :

Both a fetus and a newborn certainly are human beings and potential persons, but neither is a ‘person’ in the sense of ‘subject of a moral right to life’. We take ‘person’ to mean an individual who is capable of attributing to her own existence some (at least) basic value such that being deprived of this existence represents a loss to her.

References:

Giubilini, Alberto & Minerva, Francesca (2013). After-birth abortion: why should the baby live?. Journal of Medical Ethics, 39, 261-263. PDF

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This question appears to be off-topic because it is about abortion debate more than psychology of newborns per se. The psychology has to be able to stand separate from that. –  John Aug 20 '13 at 14:58
    
Perhaps frame your question without the unnecessary debate and just about theory of mind with respect to newborns. –  John Aug 20 '13 at 14:59
    
I'm not sure this is answerable scientifically, it ends up being more philosophical. –  Chuck Sherrington Aug 20 '13 at 18:34
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closed as off-topic by John, Chuck Sherrington, Jens Kouros, H.Muster, Josh Gitlin Aug 30 '13 at 21:08

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