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I would like to know if there are studies that (1) model the field of view taking into account all degrees of freedom of the head, neck and eyes and (2) if there is any probabilistic model assigned to the field that is independent from external stimuli, e.g. saliency.

An example to illustrate this, is the following:
A man is inside a black room (no saliency, no external stimuli) and he is walking or standing. Now, inside this room, take a point in space that is not on the man. What is the likelihood that the man gazes (equals to have the right head, eye and neck coordination) towards this point at a given moment t1?

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1 Answer 1

Disclaimer: This answer is a bit self-serving because it only describes research work from the lab where I am a student. However, I think it's relevant for the question!

Coordination of eye, head, and hand

http://www.cis.rit.edu/research/vpl/publications/ExpBrainRes2001.pdf

Pelz, J., Hayhoe, M., & Loeber, R. (2001). The coordination of eye, head, and hand movements in a natural task. Experimental Brain Research, 139(3), 266-277.

This paper analyzes eye, head, and hand movements in subjects while they copy a block pattern. It doesn't incorporate any of the neck movements as such, though.

Predictive saccades in virtual reality

http://www.journalofvision.org/content/13/1/20.full

Diaz, G., Cooper, J., Rothkopf, C., & Hayhoe, M. (2013). Saccades to future ball location reveal memory-based prediction in a virtual-reality interception task. Journal of vision, 13(1), 20.

In this work, a virtual racquetball task is used to elicit predictive eye movements in freely-moving subjects while wearing a head-mounted virtual reality display (including an eye tracker). The VR display and racquet are tracked using a motion-capture tool. The results are mostly focused on eye-in-head but incorporate some neat methods for extracting gaze points using the virtual world, and for showing the data on a graph.

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