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I wonder why people like to be touched so much, why would it make sense from a evolutionary perspective. I know people enjoy hugs and company of opposite sex but even people from the same sex hug and touch each other (especially girls)

I wonder how this behavior could have evolved. Was it the struggle to keep warm that drawn people physically together. Does it all have to do with mating. I was looking online but i couldnt find a good in-depth answer.

Maybe there just insnt enough data to specify how this behavior started out in which case that would be the answer.

In any case I appreciate all input i could get.

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Animals like touch and physical contact, too. Does not seem to be a specific human behavior. –  user1196 Mar 18 '13 at 18:50
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You might want to read this review of social touch research: Thayer, S. (1986). History and strategies of research on social touch. Journal of Nonverbal Behavior, 10(1), 12-28. –  Jeromy Anglim Mar 19 '13 at 1:11
    
Take a look for articles on Emotional touch –  Ben Brocka Mar 20 '13 at 14:35

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Of all the senses, touch is the one that most connects a person to the external environment. When two people touch each other (a handshake, a hug, a kiss, etc.) a connection/bond is made. This bonding is deeply involved with social development and emotional interaction.

Interpersonal relationships are essential for social interactions. It is important to known where the boundaries are in your culture, so that personal space is respected. This varies widely between cultures and persons.

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This briefly touches on the "how", but not really the "why". Could you elaborate on it a bit? –  Chuck Sherrington Mar 20 '13 at 1:10

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