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What are the scientific reasons behind someone talking with him/herself? Is it a disorder of some kind? By "talking" I also mean writing to self.

By self-talk I mean a person (P) is talking with self in a Q&A format. For example-

PQ: Hey, what happened?

PA: I'm not liking it here.

PQ: Why, what is it that you are not liking it?

PA: I don't like the attitudes of people around here. Everyone thinks he's very smart ...

PQ: But why is it affecting you?

and so on ..

The above kind of dialogue can either be spoken or written. Usually, one party asks another about their problems/feelings and suggests solutions / gives instructions to other party.

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closed as unclear what you're asking by Why Do You Think That Is True, Krysta, Chuck Sherrington, Josh Gitlin Aug 30 '13 at 21:25

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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I think you will need to more clearly define "self-talk" in order to have an answerable question. Do you mean talking out aloud or also internal thoughts? At one extreme, the entire internal monologue could be seen as self-talk. –  Jeromy Anglim Sep 21 '12 at 13:55
    
I mean the kind of self-talk where the terms like 'you' and 'me' are used. I edited the question a bit. –  user13107 Sep 21 '12 at 14:10
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reminds me of the Dialogical Self. Not sure about the neurobiology off the top of my head but my gut is screaming Wernicke's and Broca's areas. –  Keegan Keplinger Sep 21 '12 at 20:38
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Also, do they do it consciously and intentionally, or not? For example, if I am alone and bored or working and bored, I often mutter to myself. But I do it to amuse myself, I don't actually think I'm two different people. –  Josh Gitlin Sep 21 '12 at 20:56
    
I would think that this is just a generalized form of internal dialogue. Don't you debate with yourself on what kind of breakfast you would want in the morning? I mean, this kind of back and forth is how you make any basic pro-con list. –  Indolering Mar 11 '13 at 1:33
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