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What is a good source for case studies on a broad range of personality disorders?

I'm a writer and I'm interested in reading some case studies for character work. I've found some websites with classic case studies, but I would really like to find some something less historical, more modern.

Everything I've found online so far is topic related or deals with research studies that put people in tests (like the Stanford Prison Experiment).

Something like Clinical Case Studies would be great, but the articles are about $30 bucks online. Are there any open-access journals or website with articles like Clinical Case Studies?

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Welcome to Cognitive Sciences liz! The scope of your question is overly broad. I suggest you do a bit of research first to find anything which interests you. If more focused questions arise from that you are more than welcome to ask them here. You could also join chat for a general discussion which could give you some ideas. –  Steven Jeuris Aug 7 '12 at 21:31
    
@StevenJeuris I think this question could probably be made into something reasonable. I've edited it to make it slightly more polished. But I'll leave it to you or others to say whether you think it's good enough to re-open. The question asks specifically about where to find case studies of personality disorders. One answer would be the journal "Clinical Case Studies".I could elaborate in an answer. scholar.google.com.au/… –  Jeromy Anglim Aug 8 '12 at 8:19
    
@JeromyAnglim I agree the question can be shaped into a good one, but it is lacking severely in initial research. I'm all for reopening if the OP is prepared to expand on it a bit. Perhaps expand on the background, and outline the already found sources and why they weren't suitable/complete enough. –  Steven Jeuris Aug 8 '12 at 10:09
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Given that Liz has added more detail and Ofri has voted to re-open, I've clicked re-open. Of course, feel free to make an argument for why it should remain closed. –  Jeromy Anglim Aug 9 '12 at 0:09
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I removed my downvote on the question, the present form shows a good initial research effort of liz's part. I made some minor edits to tags and the text, let me know if I lost the spirit of the question (I added an open-access clause, since OP seems to be looking for free resources). –  Artem Kaznatcheev Aug 9 '12 at 2:12

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Clinical Case Studies is a journal devoted to the write up of case studies. To quote the site:

It presents cases involving individual, couples, and family therapy. The easy-to-follow case presentation format allows you to learn how interesting and challenging cases were assessed and conceptualized, and how treatment followed such conceptualization. This practical format allows clinicians to replicate successful treatments in their own practices.

Articles follow a 12 step format:

  1. Theoretical and Research Basis for Treatment
  2. Case Introduction
  3. Presenting Complaints
  4. History
  5. Assessment
  6. Case Conceptualization (this is where the clinician’s thinking and treatment selection come to the forefront)
  7. Course of Treatment and Assessment of Progress
  8. Complicating Factors (including medical management)
  9. Access and Barriers to Care
  10. Follow-Up (how and how long)
  11. Treatment Implications of the Case
  12. Recommendations to Clinicians and Students.

You can search within the publication using Google Scholar (publication = clinical case studies).

If price per article is an issue, a few options include:

  • get access through a library or university.
  • Subscribe to the entire journal ( this is generally cheaper than per article costs).
  • examine the subset of articles where authors provide a copy of the PDF online. In Google scholar, see the articles with [PDF] in brackets.

Example article

E.g., See this example by Leedy, Jackson, and Callahan (2007):

The following case study illustrates a client-centered, cognitive-behavioral approach to the psychological treatment of Mr. M, a 41-year-old male diagnosed with chronic Lyme disease, a mood disorder from Lyme disease, and narcissistic personality disorder. Mr. M’s personality difficulties are conceptualized as representing compensatory narcissism, a strategic way of coping with feelings of insecurity. The goals of treatment included positively integrating Mr. M’s chronic illness into his identity, decreasing depressive symptoms, and improving his interpersonal skills. Treatment was successful in decreasing both Mr. M’s depressive symptoms and his narcissistic orientation to thinking and interacting with others.

References

  • Leedy, M.J., Jackson, M. & Callahan, J.L. (2007). Treating Depression and Compensatory Narcissistic Personality Style in a Man With Chronic Lyme Disease. Clinical Case Studies, 6, 430-442. PDF
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Not sure if this is what you're looking for, but here are a few major academic journals on neuropsychology and neurology (in no particular order):

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Not exactly what I was going for, but they look interesting. Thanks! –  liz Aug 8 '12 at 17:13

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